ISERP Executive Committee

  • Professor of Political Science; Dean of Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director of the Center on African-American Politics and Society

    Fredrick C. Harris is Dean of Social Science and Professor of Political Science. He also serves as Director of the Center on African American Politics and Society.

    Professor Harris’s research interests are primarily in American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. His publications include Something Within: Religion in African American Political Activism, which was awarded the V.O. Key Book Award by the Southern Political Science Association, the Best Book Award by the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, and the Best Book Award by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists.

    He is also the co-author of Countervailing Forces in African-American Civic Activism,1973-1994, which received the W.E.B. DuBois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and the Ralph Bunche Award from the American Political Science Association. His article "It Takes a Tragedy to Arouse Them: Collective Memory and Collective Action during the Civil Rights Movement," published in Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Political Protest, received the Mary Parker Follet Award for best article by the American Political Science Association's section on Politics and History. He is co-editor with Cathy Cohen of the Oxford University Press book series "Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities."

    Professor Harris's most recent books are The Price of the Ticket: Barack Obama and the Rise and Decline of Black Politics (Oxford University Press, 2012), and, with Robert Lieberman, Beyond Discrimination: Racial Inequality in a Post-Racist Era (Russell Sage Foundation Press, 2013). The Price of the Ticket received the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Non-Fiction. His essays have appeared in Dissent, the London Review of Books, The New York Times, Society, Souls, Transition, and the Washington Post. Professor Harris has served as Vice President of the American Political Science Association. A non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, Professor Harris has also served as a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., and a Visiting Professor at the Pantheon-Sorbonne University in Paris.

  • Elizabeth A. Povinelli is the Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise. Her first two books, Labor's Lot: The Power, History and Culture of Aboriginal Action (The University of Chicago Press, 1994) and The Cunning of Recognition: Indigenous Alterities and the Making of Australian Multiculturalism (Duke University Press, 2002), examine the governance of the otherwise in late liberal settler colonies from the perspective of the politics of recognition. Her last two books, Economies of Abandonment: Social Belonging and Endurance in Late Liberalism (Duke University Press, 2011) and The Empire of Love: Toward a Theory of Intimacy, Geneology, and Carnality. A Public Planet Book. (Duke University Press, 2006), examined the same from the perspective of intimacy, embodiment, and narrative form. Her ethnographic analysis is animated by a critical engagement with the traditions of American pragmatism and continental immanent theory.
  • Wallace S. Sayre Professor of Government

    Robert Y. Shapiro (Ph.D., Chicago, 1982) is a professor and former chair of the Department of Political Science at Columbia University, and he served as acting director of Columbia’s Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP) during 2008-2009. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award in 2012 and in 2010 the Outstanding Achievement Award of the New York Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (NYAAPOR). He specializes in American politics with research and teaching interests in public opinion, policymaking, political leadership, the mass media, and applications of statistical methods. He has taught at Columbia since 1982 after receiving his degree and serving as a study director at the National Opinion Research Center (University of Chicago).

  • Associate Professor of Sociology

    I am Associate Professor of Sociology, and faculty affiliate of the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC), Weatherhead East Asian Institute (WEAI), Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP), and Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) at Columbia University.

    My research focuses on social stratification and inequality by primarily examining (1) the social and political development in contemporary China, and (2) how migration intersects with micro- and macro-level social and political processes to shape inequalities in destination and origin societies. Within these general areas, my work connects to a range of research areas in labor markets, health, families and children, gender, social capital, and collective action. It seeks to demonstrate how studies of social change in China and of migration can inform the general sociological theories in these areas that are largely drawn from Western societies and from the experiences of dominant population groups.

    I have pursued this research agenda from an international and comparative perspective, with a special focus on the Chinese society. I have collaborated with a team of international scholars to develop and conduct a national survey on the effect of migration on children in China. My research has been funded by several grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health (including a K01 Career Development Award), the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Chiang Ching-Kuo Foundation.

  • Professor of History and Co-Director of ISERP

    Matthew Connelly, associate professor, works on the history of eugenics, migration, and birth control. His most recent book, Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population, has just been published by Harvard University Press. His research articles have appeared in such journals as Population and Development Review, Comparative Studies in Society and History, The International Journal of Middle East Studies, The American Historical Review, Journal of Global History, and Past & Present. He has also published commentary on international affairs in The Atlantic Monthly and The National Interest. He received his B.A. from Columbia(1990) and his Ph.D. from Yale (1997).

  • E. Rowan and Barbara Steinschneider Professor of Economics
  • George Blumenthal Professor and Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Senior Vice Dean and Chief Academic Officer School of Professional Studies

    Sharyn O'Halloran is the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economy and Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University in New York City. A political scientist and economist by training, O’Halloran has written extensively on issues related to the political economy of international trade and finance, regulation and institutional reform, economic growth and democratic transitions, and the political representation of minorities.

    O’Halloran received a BA degree in economics and political science from University of California, San Diego. O’Halloran then went on to receive her MA and PhD, also from University of California, San Diego. Her work focuses on formal and quantitative methods and their application to politics, economics, and public policy.

    Her publications include Politics, Process and American Trade Policy (University of Michigan Press), Delegating Powers (Cambridge University Press), The Future of the Voting Rights Act (Russell Sage Foundation), as well as numerous journal articles on administrative procedures and agency design, with application to U.S. trade and financial regulatory policy, including those published in the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, International Organization, Yale Law Journal, NYU Law Journal, and the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization.

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