September 2018

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Cognition and Decision Seminar Series - Colin Camerer Talk

Cognition and Decision Seminar Series - Colin Camerer Talk

September 13, 2018
4:15 pm - 5:30 pm

Location: 

Greene Science Center, 9th floor Lecture Hall

Event Type: 

The Cognition and Decision Seminar Series brings together scholars from economics, psychology, neuroscience and other fields who are united by an interest in the cognitive mechanisms involved in decision making and related behavior, and the ways in which a better understanding of these mechanisms can lead to more accurate models of human behavior and more effective public policies. Research presented in the seminars employs a variety of methods, including but not limited to physiological measurement of nervous systems, observation of decision making in laboratory settings, computational modeling of decision processes, and normative analyses of optimal decisions subject to information constraints or limits on the complexity of processing.

The seminar meets from 4:15-5:30 PM, generally on Thursdays in the Greene Science Center, 9th floor Lecture Hall (press for directions). Registration is required, in order to allow entry to the building.

The seminar organizers are Mark Dean, Eric Johnson, Michael Shadlen, Daphna Shohamy, and Michael Woodford. The Cognition and Decision Seminar Series is jointly sponsored by the Cognitive and Behavioral Economics Initiative of the Department of Economics, and the Center for Decision Sciences of Columbia Business School.

To stay up to date on the seminar series, please join the mailing list.


Colin Camerer – “Using Visual Saliency in Game Theory”

Thursday, September 13, 2018, 4:15 pm - 5:30 pm

Greene Science Center, 9th floor Lecture Hall

We measure and study visual salience in two-player games, in which players both prefer to match choices of locations or one prefers match and the other mismatch (hide-and-seek). Visual salience is pre...

Find out more >>

4:15 pm - 5:30 pm
 
David Singer (MIT)

David Singer (MIT)

September 13, 2018

Event Type: 

Please join us at CUIPS on Thursday, September 13th for a talk from David Singer (MIT). David will be presenting a paper entitled, "Attitudes Toward Internal and Foreign Migration: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in China." The abstract appears below:

Abstract: We explore attitudes toward internal and foreign migration in China using an original survey experiment. If labor market competition drives attitudes, then residents will be opposed to migrants with comparable skill levels, regardless of migrant origin. If residents fear a dilution of their national identity, then they will be more opposed to foreign migration than internal migration. We test these arguments by randomly assigning respondents to answer questions about migrants with different skills levels and from either foreign countries or other provinces in China. We find that attitudes cleave universally over skill level, but the foreign-internal dimension is, on its own, not a salient cleavage in preferences. However, when considering high-skilled migrants, respondents are more supportive of foreign than internal migration; when considering low-skilled migrants, they are more opposed to foreign than internal migration. The results cast further doubt on material explanations for attitudes toward migration and suggest a reevaluation of cultural threat arguments that privilege nationality and national borders.

As always, we will meet in the Lindsay Rogers Room (707 IAB) and a light lunch will be served at 12:15pm, followed by David's talk at 12:30pm.

Documents: 

 
Thursday, 9/13, 4:20PM - Workshop on 20th Century Politics and Society - Professor Nadia Urbinati (Columbia)

Thursday, 9/13, 4:20PM - Workshop on 20th Century Politics and Society - Professor Nadia Urbinati (Columbia)

September 13, 2018
4:20PM to 6:20PM

Location: 

Lehman Center, Room 406, IAB, 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

The 20th Century Politics and Society Workshop (Ira Katznelson, Adam Tooze, and Jeremy Kessler, co-conveners) will hold its first meeting of the Fall semester on Thursday, September 13, 2018.

The Workshop brings together scholars in political science, history, sociology, anthropology, law, economics and related disciplines to consider issues of shared interest.

Professor Nadia Urbinati (Columbia, Political Science) will join the workshop to discuss material from her book, Democracy Disfigured, in light of recent debates about the "crisis of democracy."

The reading material and the remainder of the schedule is available on the workshop's web page: http://iserp.columbia.edu/workshop/workshop-20th-century-politics-and-so...

The meeting will be held at 4:20 PM, in the Lehman Center, Room 406 IAB, 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027.

4:20PM to 6:20PM
 
 
 
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Celebrating Recent Work by Adam Tooze

Celebrating Recent Work by Adam Tooze

September 24, 2018
6:15pm

Location: 

The Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room

Event Type: 

New Books in the Arts & Sciences

Celebrating Recent Work by Adam Tooze

Monday, September 24, 2018  6:15pmThe Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room

Registration

Free and open to the public

No registration necessary

First come, first seated

New Books in the Arts & Sciences:
Celebrating Recent Work by Adam Tooze

Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World
By: Adam Tooze

From a prizewinning economic historian, an eye-opening reinterpretation of the 2008 economic crisis (and its ten-year aftermath) as a global event that directly led to the shockwaves being felt around the world today.

In September 2008 President George Bush could still describe the financial crisis as an incident local to Wall Street. In fact it was a dramatic caesura of global significance that spiraled around the world, from the financial markets of the UK and Europe to the factories and dockyards of Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America, forcing a rearrangement of global governance. In the United States and Europe, it caused a fundamental reconsideration of capitalist democracy, eventually leading to the war in the Ukraine, the chaos of Greece, Brexit, and Trump. 

It was the greatest crisis to have struck Western societies since the end of the Cold War, but was it inevitable? And is it over? Crashed is a dramatic new narrative resting on original themes: the haphazard nature of economic development and the erratic path of debt around the world; the unseen way individual countries and regions are linked together in deeply unequal relationships through financial interdependence, investment, politics, and force; the ways the financial crisis interacted with the spectacular rise of social media, the crisis of middle-class America, the rise of China, and global struggles over fossil fuels. Finally, Tooze asks, given this history, what now are the prospects for a liberal, stable, and coherent world order?

Participants

  • Author

    Adam Tooze

    Kathryn and Shelby Cullom Davis Professor of History

    Columbia University

  • Speaker

    Katharina Pistor

    Michael I. Sovern Professor of Law

    Columbia Law School

  • Speaker

    Charles F. Sabel

    Maurice T. Moore Professor of Law

    Columbia Law School.

  • Speaker

    Tano Santos

    David L. and Elsie M. Dodd Professor of Finance

    Columbia Business School

  • Moderator

    Mark Mazower

    Chair

    Heyman Center for the Humanities
    Columbia University

6:15pm
 
 
 
 
What We CAN Do When There's Nothing To Be Done

What We CAN Do When There's Nothing To Be Done

September 28, 2018
9:30AM - 7:30 PM

Location: 

The Forum at Columbia University, 605 West 125th St, New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

On September 28, 2018, the Center for the Study of Social Difference is proud to present our anniversary symposium celebrating 10 years of CSSD and five years of Women Creating Change:

 
WHAT WE CAN DO WHEN THERE'S NOTHING TO BE DONE
Strategies for Change
The Forum at Columbia University, 605 West 125th St, New York, NY 10027
 
Open to the public, please register.
Registration will reopen on Sep 5th at noon:
 
This event features: Lila ABU-LUGHOD, Ayse Gül ALTINAY, Sama ALSHAIBI, Carol BECKER, Farah Jasmine GRIFFIN, Judith BUTLER, María José CONTRERAS, Ricardo DOMINGUEZ, Masha GESSEN, Rema HAMAMI, Bernard HARCOURT, Saidiya HARTMAN, Marianne HIRSCH, Jean HOWARD, Mae NGAI, Juan Carlos RUIZ, Debarati SANYAL, Lyndsey STONEBRIDGE, Diana TAYLOR, Keeanga-Yamahtta TAYLOR, Jeanine TESORI
 
With thanks to our co-sponsors: Center for Gender & Sexuality Law; Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race; Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought; Columbia Global Centers; Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty Diversity and Inclusion; School of the Arts; Dean of Humanities; Dean of Social Sciences; Department of Anthropology; Department of English and Comparative Literature; Department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures; Division of Arts and Sciences; Institute for Comparative Literature and Society; Institute for Research on African-American Studies; Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality; Middle East Institute; Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities; Barnard Center for Research on Women; Barnard College Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies; and the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics
 
 
9:30AM - 7:30 PM
 
 
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