April 2021

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Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration

Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration

April 08, 2021
5:30PM ET

Event Type: 

A Virtual Book Talk with Reuben Miller

April 8, 2021

5:30PM ET

In conversation with Rev. Vivian Nixon   |   Moderated by Bruce Western

Register Here

Reuben Miller, a chaplain at the Cook County Jail in Chicago and now a sociologist studying mass incarceration, will discuss his new and acclaimed book Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration on Thursday, April 8 at 5:30 p.m. ET with The Reverend Vivian Nixon in a conversation moderated by Bruce Western.

Praised as a “powerful book” (New York Times) and “seminal work” (NPR), Miller describes incarceration’s “afterlife” — how a single arrest can follow a person “like a ghost.” Halfway Home is based on 15 years of research and practice with currently and formerly incarcerated men, women, their families, partners, and friends, weaving their stories into a “bracing account [that] makes clear just how high the deck is stacked against the formerly incarcerated." (Publishers Weekly)

Informed by Miller’s experience as the son and brother of incarcerated men, Halfway Home is a poignant and eye-opening call to arms that reveals how laws, rules, and regulations extract a tangible cost not only from those working to rebuild their lives, but also our democracy. As Miller concludes, America must acknowledge and value the lives of its formerly imprisoned citizens.


About the Author: Reuben Jonathan Miller is a sociologist, criminologist and a social worker who teaches at the University of Chicago in the Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy and Practice. He studies and writes about race, democracy, and the social life of the city. 

Speaker: Reverend Vivian Nixon is Executive Director of College & Community Fellowship (CCF), a New York City organization that helps women and families most harmed by mass criminalization gain equitable access to opportunity and human rights. She identifies herself as a joyfully Black woman whose release from correctional oversight gave rise to a search for true liberation and guided her academic and career choices.

Moderator: Bruce Western is the Justice Lab Co-Director and Bryce Professor of Sociology and Social Justice at Columbia University. His research has examined the causes, scope, and consequences of the historic growth in U.S. prison populations.


Hosted by the Columbia Justice Lab

5:30PM ET
 
 
 
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Celebrating Recent Work by Timothy Frye

Celebrating Recent Work by Timothy Frye

April 13, 2021
12:00 PM

Location: 

Virtual Event

Event Type: 

New Books in the Arts and Sciences Presents:

Celebrating Recent Work by Timothy Frye

Weak Strongman: The Limits of Power in Putin's Russia

April 13, 12:00pm ET

Register Here

Use code FRYE for a 30% discount on purchases of the book from Princeton UP. Add Weak Strongman to your cart, and enter code FRYE at checkout. This code is valid through May 31, 2021.

Media and public discussion tends to understand Russian politics as a direct reflection of Vladimir Putin’s seeming omnipotence or Russia’s unique history and culture. Yet Russia is remarkably similar to other autocracies—and recognizing this illuminates the inherent limits to Putin’s power. Weak Strongman challenges the conventional wisdom about Putin’s Russia, highlighting the difficult trade-offs that confront the Kremlin on issues ranging from election fraud and repression to propaganda and foreign policy.

Drawing on three decades of his own on-the-ground experience and research as well as insights from a new generation of social scientists that have received little attention outside academia, Timothy Frye reveals how much we overlook about today’s Russia when we focus solely on Putin or Russian exceptionalism. Frye brings a new understanding to a host of crucial questions: How popular is Putin? Is Russian propaganda effective? Why are relations with the West so fraught? Can Russian cyber warriors really swing foreign elections? In answering these and other questions, Frye offers a highly accessible reassessment of Russian politics that highlights the challenges of governing Russia and the nature of modern autocracy.

Rich in personal anecdotes and cutting-edge social science, Weak Strongman offers the best evidence available about how Russia actually works.


About the Author:

Timothy Frye (Ph.D., Columbia, 1997) is the Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy and Chair of the Department of Political Science. Professor Frye received a B.A. in Russian language and literature from Middlebury College in 1986, an M.I.A. from Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs in 1992, and a Ph.D. from Columbia in 1997. His research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy with a focus on the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. He is the author of Brokers and Bureaucrats: Building Markets in Russia, which won the 2001 Hewett Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, and Building States and Markets after Communism: The Perils of Polarized Democracy, which won a Best Book Prize from the APSA Comparative Democratization section in 2010; and Property Rights and Property Wrongs: How Power, Institutions, and Norms Shape Economic Conflict in Russia, which was published in 2017. He has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the U.S. Agency for International Development among others. He is also Director of the International Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at State Research University-Higher Economics School, Moscow.

Speakers:

Stephen Kotkin has been teaching in the department since 1989. He holds a joint appointment in the Princeton School for Public and International Affairs at Princeton. He is also a Research Scholar at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Professor Kotkin established the Princeton department's Global History initiative and workshop, and teaches the graduate seminar on global history since the 1850s. He served on the core editorial committee of the World Politics, flagship journal in comparative politics. He founded and co-edited a book series on Northeast Asia that published six volumes. From 2003 until 2007, he was a member and then chair of the editorial board at Princeton University Press. From 1996 until 2009 he directed Princeton's Program in Russian and Eurasian Studies. He has been the vice dean of the Princeton School for Public and International Affairs (formerly Woodrow Wilson School for Public and International Affairs) and acting director of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS). In 2014-15 he is serving as acting director of what is now Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. Outside Princeton, from 2006 (until taking a break in February 2009) he was the regular book reviewer for the New York Times Sunday Business section. His latest book is Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941 (Penguin, 2017). His research interests include authoritarianism, geopolitics, global political economy, empire, and modernism in the arts and politics.

Maria Victoria Murillo (Ph.D., Harvard, 1997) holds a joint appointment with the Department of Political Science and the School of International and Public Affairs and is currently the Director of the Institute for Latin American Studies (ILAS). Murillo's research on distributive politics in Latin America has covered labor politics and labor regulations, public utility reform, education reform, agricultural policies, and economic policy more generally. Her more recent work focuses on electoral behavior, contentious dynamics, and the analysis of institutional weakness. Her empirical work is based on a variety of methods ranging from quantitative analysis of datasets built for all Latin American countries to qualitative field work in Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and Venezuela and survey and experiments in Argentina and Chile. Murillo received her B.A. from the Universidad de Buenos Aires and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. Murillo has taught at Yale University, was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University (Harvard Academy for Area Studies & David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies), and at the Russell Sage Foundation, as well as a Fulbright fellow.

Keith Gessen is a founding editor of n+1 and a contributor to The New Yorker and The London Review of Books. He is the editor of three nonfiction books and the translator or co-translator, from Russian, of a collection of short stories, a book of poems, and a work of oral history. He is also the author of a novel, “All the Sad Young Literary Men.” Most of Gessen's journalistic work has focused on the effects of the collapse of communism on the countries of what used to be the Soviet Union. His New Yorker article on the insoluble problem of Moscow traffic -- a legacy of militant Soviet urban design combined with the anti-planning ethos of hypercapitalism — was included in Best American Travel Essays in 2011. His New Yorker story on the opening to shipping of the Northern Sea Route above the Russian Arctic as a result of global warming was included in Best American Science and Nature Writing in 2013. Most recently he has been writing on the post-revolutionary crisis in Ukraine, both from the perspective of the hopeful (pro-European) western and central portions of the country, and its traumatized (pro-Russian) east.

Moderated by: Gregory Wawro (Ph.D., Cornell, 1997) specializes in American politics (including Congress, elections, campaign finance, judicial politics, and political economy) and political methodology. He is the author of Legislative Entrepreneurship in the U.S. House of Representatives and co-author (with Eric Schickler) of Filibuster: Obstruction and Lawmaking in the United States Senate, which is an historical analysis of the causes and consequences of filibusters. He has published articles in The American Journal of Political Science, The Annual Review of Political Science, Critical Review, Legislative Studies Quarterly, the Journal of Law Economics and Organization, and Political Analysis. His academic awards include the Richard J. Fenno Prize for best book in legislative studies in 2006, the E.E. Schattschneider Award, the Milton J. Esman Award, the CQ Prize for best paper presented in the Legislative Studies section at the 2002 APSA meeting, a Mellon Foundation Graduate Fellowship, and a John M. Olin Faculty Fellowship. He has been a visiting scholar at the Center for Basic Research in the Social Sciences at Harvard University.


Register Here

This event is sponsored by ISERP, the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Dean of the Division of Social Science, and the Political Science Department.

12:00 PM
 
Advance Warning Systems and Forecasting Outbreaks

Advance Warning Systems and Forecasting Outbreaks

April 14, 2021
12:00pm ET

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required

Event Type: 

The History and Future of Planetary Threats

Advance Warning Systems and Forecasting Outbreaks

Wednesday April 14, 2021

12:00 - 1:30 PM ET (New York)

Register Here

The wide scale health and societal impact of COVID-19 have thrown into stark relief the lack of coordinated advance warning systems for epidemics and pandemics. This seminar will feature public health and policy experts discussing the forecasting of infectious disease outbreaks; where we stand now, and what systems will be developed in years to come. Learn what kind of data generation, systems and technologies require investment to develop advanced warning systems for better prevention and preparedness. Currently, the full force of epidemiological expertise in the United States is not being brought to bear to solve the problem. The absence of a centralized system for disease forecasting leaves too many gaps hampering the capability of infectious disease models to inform public health policy. The best way to address these vulnerabilities would be to establish a National Center for Epidemic Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics, which would handle research and development in outbreak science, develop technology for producing disease forecasts, and provide guidance for preparedness and response to outbreaks.

This seminar will be moderated by Wilmot James (ISERP Senior Research Scholar) and Alex Halliday (Director, Earth Institute).

Featuring:

Overview of the National Center for Epidemic Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics

Caitlin Rivers (Johns Hopkins University) and Dylan George (In-Q-Tel)

On the first full day in office, the Biden-Harris administration announced an intention to create a National Center for Epidemic Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics. Modeled after the National Weather Service, this epidemic forecasting center would help public health officials to anticipate and respond to outbreaks before they grow into epidemics or pandemics. This capability must be developed to ensure the country is never caught unprepared again. Intimately involved in its development, Dylan George and Caitlin Rivers will review the background and origins of this Center. They will outline the reasons for and implementation of epidemic forecasting and analytics, which already play a key role in decision making during biological threats but is currently done by volunteers in academia. A National Center for Epidemic Forecasting and Outbreak Analytics would professionalize this important work and ensure that federal, state and local leaders have the capabilities at hand to respond to urgent threats.

Responses from:

Improving Infectious Disease Forecast

Jeffrey Shaman (Columbia Mailman School of Public Health)

Weather forecasting in historical perspective

James Fleming (Colby College)


About the Speakers:

Dr. Caitlin Rivers is a Senior Scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on improving public health preparedness and response, particularly by improving capabilities for “outbreak science” and infectious disease modeling to support public health decision making. Dr. Rivers participated as author or contributor in influential reports that are guiding the US response to COVID-19. In May 2020, Dr. Rivers testified in front of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies on the COVID-19 response.

Dr. Rivers has worked as an epidemiologist for the US Army Public Health Center as a Department of Defense Science, Mathematics, and Research for Transformation Scholar. She also participated in a National Science and Technology Council Pandemic Prediction and Forecasting Science and Technology working group. Dr. Rivers serves as an Associate Editor of the journal Health Security.

Dr. Rivers has been awarded the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Faculty Award for Excellence in US Public Health Practice; the Department of the Army Achievement Medal for Civilian Service; and a Department of Defense Science, Engineering, Mathematics and Research Transformation Scholarship. In 2015, she received a PhD in genetics, bioinformatics, and computational biology from Virginia Tech. Her doctoral research focused on computational epidemiology, specifically modeling emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza A (H7N9), Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and Ebola virus disease for public health support using nontraditional, publicly available sources of data. She also received an MPH with a concentration in infectious disease from Virginia Tech in 2013 and a BA in anthropology from the University of New Hampshire in 2011.

Dylan George, Ph.D., is a Vice President at In-Q-Tel (IQT). Dr. George supports technical evaluations of life science and healthcare deals, drives strategic science and technical vision to strengthen capacity within the United States to counter biological threats from infectious disease epidemics.

Dr. George served on the Biden Transition team supporting National Security and Foreign Policy, and the agency review team for the Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to joining IQT, Dr. George served Dr. John Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science and Technology and Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), as Senior Policy Advisor for Biological Threat Defense. Among other responsibilities at OSTP, Dr. George provided technical expertise and interagency coordination supporting the response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. From 2013-2014, Dr. George worked in the Department of Health and Human Services within the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority where he led a team that developed analytical approaches to assess risks from emerging infectious diseases and other mass casualty events. From 2009-2013, Dr. George worked within the Department of Defense on anticipating and assessing infectious disease risks that would impact mission readiness and force health protection. Dr. George worked at the National Science Foundation within the Divisions of Biological Infrastructure and Environmental Biology. While at NSF Dr. George supported, among other activities, the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Ecology of Infectious Diseases program.

Dr. George received his Ph.D. from Colorado State University and focused on quantitative analytical approaches for considering how clinically severe pathogens (e.g., Yersinia pestis, rabies) persist within wildlife populations.

Jeffrey Shaman, PhD, focuses on climate, atmospheric science and hydrology, as well as biology, and studies the environmental determinants of infectious disease transmission and infectious disease forecast. For the former, Dr. Shaman investigates how hydrologic variability affects mosquito ecology and mosquito-borne disease transmission, how atmospheric conditions impact the survival, transmission and seasonality of pathogens, and, how meteorology affects human health, in general. For the latter, he is engaged in developing mathematical and statistical systems for generating forecasts of infectious disease outbreaks at a range of time scales. In addition, Dr. Shaman is studying a number of climate phenomena, including Rossby wave dynamics, atmospheric jet waveguides, the coupled South Asian monsoon-ENSO system, extratropical precipitation, and tropical cyclogenesis.

James Rodger Fleming is the Charles A. Dana Professor of Science, Technology, and Society at Colby College, Maine. He earned a B.S. in astronomy from Pennsylvania State University, an M.S. in atmospheric science from Colorado State University, and a Ph.D. in history from Princeton University. His books include Meteorology in America (1990), Historical Perspectives on Climate Change (1998), The Callendar Effect (2007), Fixing the Sky (2010), Inventing Atmospheric Science (2016), and FIRST WOMAN: Joanne Simpson and the Tropical Atmosphere (2020). He is series editor of Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology. Jim has spent productive sabbatical years at MIT, Harvard (twice), the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and Columbia University. He frequently presents keynote or invited lectures at domestic and international venues, and his opinions are sought out by major media outlets and documentary filmmakers. His engagement with public policy includes writing and reviewing for the International Panel on Climate Change, testimony to Congress, and service on two U.S. National Academy of Sciences study panels.

Register Here


ISERP Series: The History and Future of Planetary Threats

In this series, ISERP convenes meetings to examine historic and conteporary catastrophic risks and hazards, whether natural, accident or deliberate, in the following domains: geological, biological, epidemic infectious disease, environmental, chemical, extreme weather, radiological and nuclear, or combinations of these. By catastrophic we understand to mean classes of events that could lead to sudden, extraordinary, widespread disaster beyond the collective capacity of national and international organizations and the private sector to control, causing severe disruptions in normal social functioning, heavy tolls in terms of morbidity and mortality, and major economic losses; in sum, events that may well cause a change the direction of history. Nuclear falls into a class of its own, because it can result in the annihilation of life on planet earth and the end of history as we know it.


This event is co-sponsored by:

  • Center for Pandemic Research at the Institute for Social Research and Policy (ISERP)
  • Program in Vaccine Education, Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • Earth Institute
  • Academy of Political Science
  • Data Science Institute

Register Here

12:00pm ET
 
 
 
 
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Celebrating Recent Work by Frank Guridy

Celebrating Recent Work by Frank Guridy

April 21, 2021
4:00 PM ET

Location: 

Virtual Event

Event Type: 

New Books in the Arts and Sciences Presents:

Celebrating Recent Work by Frank A. Guridy

The Sports Revolution: How Texas Changed the Culture of American Athletics

April 21, 4:00pm ET

Register Here

The story of Texas’s impact on American sports culture during the civil rights and second-wave feminist movements, this book offers a new understanding of sports and society in the state and the nation as a whole.

In the 1960s and 1970s, America experienced a sports revolution. New professional sports franchises and leagues were established, new stadiums were built, football and basketball grew in popularity, and the proliferation of television enabled people across the country to support their favorite teams and athletes from the comfort of their homes. At the same time, the civil rights and feminist movements were reshaping the nation, broadening the boundaries of social and political participation. The Sports Revolution tells how these forces came together in the Lone Star State.

Tracing events from the end of Jim Crow to the 1980s, Frank Guridy chronicles the unlikely alliances that integrated professional and collegiate sports and launched women’s tennis. He explores the new forms of inclusion and exclusion that emerged during the era, including the role the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders played in defining womanhood in the age of second-wave feminism. Guridy explains how the sexual revolution, desegregation, and changing demographics played out both on and off the field as he recounts how the Washington Senators became the Texas Rangers and how Mexican American fans and their support for the Spurs fostered a revival of professional basketball in San Antonio. Guridy argues that the catalysts for these changes were undone by the same forces of commercialization that set them in motion and reveals that, for better and for worse, Texas was at the center of America’s expanding political, economic, and emotional investments in sport.


About the Author:

Frank A. Guridy specializes in sport history, urban history, and the history of the African Diaspora in the Americas. His first book, Forging Diaspora: Afro-Cubans and African Americans in a World of Empire and Jim Crow (University of North Carolina Press, 2010), won the Elsa Goveia Book Prize from the Association of Caribbean Historians and the Wesley-Logan Book Prize, conferred by the American Historical Association. He is also the co-editor of Beyond el Barrio: Everyday Life in Latino/a America (NYU Press, 2010), with Gina Pérez and Adrian Burgos, Jr. His articles have appeared in Kalfou, Radical History Review, Caribbean Studies, Social Text, and Cuban Studies. His fellowships and awards include the Scholar in Residence Fellowship at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Ray A. Billington Professorship in American History at Occidental College and the Huntington Library. He is also an award-winning teacher, receiving the Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award from the University of Texas at Austin, and, more recently, the Mark Van Doren Award for Teaching at Columbia. His next book project, Assembly in the Fragmented City: A History of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, examines the iconic structure’s impact on the emergence of Los Angeles as a global city.

About the speakers:

Amy Bass is Professor of Sport Studies at Manhattanville College, where her interests focus on sport, culture, and politics, and Chair of the Division of Social Science & Communication.  She received a Ph.D. with distinction in history with a comparative in cultural studies from Stony Brook University, and did her undergraduate work at Bates College.  Her first book, Not the Triumph but the Struggle: the 1968 Olympic Games and the Making of the Black Athlete, is considered a standard-bearer for those interested in studying sport from a cultural perspective.  Her followup, In the Game, solidified that reputation.  Her third book, Those About Him Remained Silent: the Battle over W.E.B. Du Bois, received Honorable Mention from the National Council on Public History. Her most recent work, ONE GOAL: A Coach, A Team, and the Game that brought a Divided Town Together, was named a best book of 2018 by the Boston Globe and Library Journal, and was featured on the Today Show, NPR's "The Takeaway," as well as other national media.  It has been optioned by Netflix.  In its starred review of the book, Kirkus called ONE GOAL "an edifying and adrenaline-charged tale," while the Wall Street Journal declared it "the perfect parable for our time," and the Globe & Mail dubbed it "magnificent and significant." 

Josef Sorett is Professor of Religion and African American and African Diaspora Studies at Columbia University, where he is also chair of the Department of Religion and directs the Center on African-American Religion, Sexual Politics and Social Justice. As an interdisciplinary scholar of religion and race in the Americas, Josef employs primarily historical and literary approaches to the study of religion in black communities and cultures in the United States. His first book, Spirit in the Dark: A Religious History of Racial Aesthetics (Oxford University Press, 2016) illumines how religion has figured in debates about black art and culture across the 20th century. A second book, The Holy Holy Black: The Ironies of an American Secular, is forthcoming with Oxford UP. Josef’s scholarly work has been supported with grants from the Henry Luce Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the E. Rhodes and Leone B. Carpenter Foundation, the Arcus Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Louisville Institute, the Forum for Theological Exploration, and Yale University’s Institute for Sacred Music. His research has been published in academic journals and anthologies; and his writing and commentary have also appeared in a range of popular media outlets, including ABC News, the New York Times, and the Washington Post, as well as on the BBC and NPR.

Samuel G. Freedman is an award-winning author, columnist, and professor. A columnist for The New York Times and a professor at Columbia University, he is the author of the seven acclaimed books, including Breaking The Line: The Season in Black College Football That Transformed the Game and Changed the Course of Civil Rights (2013). A tenured professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Freedman was named the nation's outstanding journalism educator in 1997 by the Society of Professional Journalists. In 2012, he received Columbia University’s coveted Presidential Award for Outstanding Teaching. Freedman’s class in book-writing has developed more than 70 authors, editors, and agents, and it has been featured in Publishers Weekly and the Christian Science Monitor. He is a board member of the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prizes and Religion News Service as well as a judge in the non-fiction category for the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Freedman has spoken at the Smithsonian Institution, Yale University, and UCLA, among other venues, and has appeared on National Public Radio, CNN, the PBS News Hour, MSNBC and ESPN.

Moderated by: Farah Jasmine Griffin is the William B. Ransford Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African-American Studies at Columbia University and the chair of its African American and African Diaspora Studies Department. She also serves as program director for The Schomburg Center's Scholars-in-Residence Program. Professor Griffin received her BA from Harvard, where she majored in American History and Literature and her PhD in American Studies from Yale. Her major fields of interest are American and African American literature, music, and history. She has published widely on issues of race and gender, feminism and cultural politics. In addition, Griffin’s essays and articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Harper's Bazaar, Art Forum and numerous other publications. She is also a frequent radio commentator on political and cultural issues.  Her activism has centered on issues of education, poverty and gender equity especially as they impact women and children. She currently sits on the board of The Brotherhood/Sister Sol, an organization that provides comprehensive, holistic and long-term support services to youth in Central Harlem.


Register Here

This event is sponsored by ISERP, the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, the Dean of the Division of Social Science, the African American and African Diaspora Studies Department, and the History Department.

4:00 PM ET
 
 
 
 
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The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP) is closed in accordance with the University’s COVID-19 policy.  Please click here for additional information and guidance for students, affiliates, and employees.

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