October 2017

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“A good fight: violence and female excellence in northern Chad”

“A good fight: violence and female excellence in northern Chad”

October 04, 2017
4:10pm-6:00pm

Location: 

Room 963, Schermerhorn Extension Reception to Follow in the Robert F. Murphy/Morton H. Fried Department of Anthropology Lounge Room 465, Schermerhorn Extension

Event Type: 

Columbia University

Department of Anthropology together with The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP)

Cordially invite you to attend a

FRANZ  BOAS SEMINAR

with

Dr. Judith Scheele

All Souls College, Oxford University

“A good fight: violence and female excellence in northern Chad”

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

4:10pm-6:00pm

Room 963, Schermerhorn Extension

Reception to Follow in the Robert F. Murphy/Morton H. Fried

Department of Anthropology Lounge

Room 465, Schermerhorn Extension

 

Columbia University, Department of Anthropology 1200 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10027 Phone: 212-854-4552 Fax: 212-854-7347

4:10pm-6:00pm
 
New York Area Political Psychology Meeting

New York Area Political Psychology Meeting

October 04, 2017
10:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Location: 

Pless Hall First Floor Lounge, 82 Washington Square East, Enter at 32 Washington Place, around the corner from Washington Square East

Event Type: 

The next biannual seminar on political psychology will meet on Saturday, November 4, 2017 at NYU.

The following papers will be presented:

Leonie Huddy and Johanna Willmann (Stony Brook), “Partisan Sorting and the Feminist Gap in American Politics”

Richard Lau (Rutgers), Tessa Ditonto (Iowa State), and Jamel Love (Rutgers), “Showdown at the OK Corral: Testing Competing Theories of Political Judgment”

Linda Tropp (University of Massachusetts Amherst) and Eric Knowles (NYU), “Weaponizing White Identity: A Longitudinal Analysis of Whites’ Beliefs about Identity Politics and Minority Collusion”

The first two papers will be presented in the morning session which will run from 10:30 A.M. to around 1:15 P.M. We will then break for lunch, which will be provided, until 2:15 P.M. The third paper will be presented in the afternoon (2:15 to about 4:00 P.M.). This schedule should give us enough time to get re-acquainted, discuss the papers, and briefly talk about plans and topics for future meetings. Please give some thought to research that you might like to present and to general themes for future sessions.

10:30 AM - 4:00 PM
 
New York Area Political Psychology Meeting

New York Area Political Psychology Meeting

October 04, 2017
10:30 am - 4:00 pm

Location: 

Pless Hall First Floor Lounge, 82 Washington Square East, Enter at 32 Washington Place, around the corner from Washington Square East

Event Type: 

The next biannual seminar on political psychology will meet on Saturday, November 4, 2017 at NYU.

The following papers will be presented:

Leonie Huddy and Johanna Willmann (Stony Brook), “Partisan Sorting and the Feminist Gap in American Politics”

Richard Lau (Rutgers), Tessa Ditonto (Iowa State), and Jamel Love (Rutgers), “Showdown at the OK Corral: Testing Competing Theories of Political Judgment”

Linda Tropp (University of Massachusetts Amherst) and Eric Knowles (NYU), “Weaponizing White Identity: A Longitudinal Analysis of Whites’ Beliefs about Identity Politics and Minority Collusion”

The first two papers will be presented in the morning session which will run from 10:30 A.M. to around 1:15 P.M. We will then break for lunch, which will be provided, until 2:15 P.M. The third paper will be presented in the afternoon (2:15 to about 4:00 P.M.). This schedule should give us enough time to get re-acquainted, discuss the papers, and briefly talk about plans and topics for future meetings. Please give some thought to research that you might like to present and to general themes for future sessions.

10:30 am - 4:00 pm
 
Avital Livny (Illinois)

Avital Livny (Illinois)

October 04, 2017

Event Type: 

Avital Livny (Illinois) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
"Earnings Inequality and the Minimum Wage: Evidence from Brazil"

"Earnings Inequality and the Minimum Wage: Evidence from Brazil"

October 05, 2017

Location: 

Knox Hall, Room 509 606 W 122nd St NY NY 10027

Event Type: 

Center for Wealth and Inequality (CWI) Seminar Series

Department of Sociology

Speaker: Christian Moser, Columbia University, Business School

Talk Title: "Earnings Inequality and the Minimum Wage: Evidence from Brazil"

Abstract: We quantify the effect of a minimum wage on compression throughout the earnings distribution. Using the case of Brazil, which experienced a large decrease in earnings inequality while its real minimum wage increased from 1996-2012, we document that the inequality decrease was bottom-driven yet widespread, with compression up to the 75th earnings percentile. We develop an equilibrium search model with heterogeneous firms and workers and find that effects of the minimum wage are consistent with the above facts, explaining 70 percent of the observed inequality decrease, with half of the decrease due to spillovers further up the earnings distribution.

Biography: Christian is an Assistant Professor within the Finance and Economics Division at Columbia Business School. His research focuses on macroeconomics and labor economics, with additional interests in public economics. The common theme behind his research is to understand the determinants of earnings inequality and the role of redistributive policies. Before joining Columbia, Christian received a Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University where he was named a Fellow of Woodrow Wilson Scholars and was awarded the Towbes Prize for Outstanding Teaching. He has attracted external research grants from the Centre for Economic Policy Research and the Department for International Development as well as the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

 
 
 
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"Polarization, Partisanship, and the Future of the Constitutional System"

"Polarization, Partisanship, and the Future of the Constitutional System"

October 11, 2017
Wednesday, October 11, 2017 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Location: 

Low Library, 535 W. 116 St., New York, NY 10027 Room/Area: Rotunda

Event Type: 

Coming to Terms with a Polarized Society

Featuring:

Nolan McCarty, Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Princeton University
“Polarization, Partisanship, and the Future of the Constitutional System.”

Panelists:
Frances Lee, Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland.
Frank Bruni, Op-Ed Columnist, New York Times.

Free and open to the public. No RSVP required.

Event Contact Information:
Kathryn Herrera
kah2213@columbia.edu

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
 
Daniel Stegmuller (Duke)

Daniel Stegmuller (Duke)

October 11, 2017

Event Type: 

Daniel Stegmuller (Duke) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
The Effects of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on the Educational Outcomes of Undocumented Students

The Effects of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on the Educational Outcomes of Undocumented Students

October 12, 2017

Location: 

509 Knox Hall 606 W. 122nd Street NY, NY 10027

Event Type: 

Center for Wealth and Inequality (CWI) Seminar Series

Department of Sociology

Speaker: Amy Hsin Queens College, City University of New York (CUNY)

Talk Title: The Effects of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on the Educational Outcomes of Undocumented Students

 
Reading group on economic emergency and the rule of law

Reading group on economic emergency and the rule of law

October 12, 2017
4:20-6:20pm

Location: 

Lehman Center Room 406 IAB 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

The Workshop on 20th Century Politics and Society (Ira Katznelson, Adam Tooze, and Jeremy Kessler, co-conveners) will hold its next session on Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 4:20PM.

We will be meeting as a reading group discussing the relationship between economic emergency and the rule of law. The readings are listed below.

1) Scheuerman, "The Economic State of Emergency," Cardozo Law Review 21 (2000).
2) Excerpts from Posner and Vermeule, The Executive Unbound (Oxford University Press, 2010).
3) Isiksel, "Functional Constitutionalism in the European Union," in Europe's Functional Constitution (Oxford University Press, 2016).

Links to the reading material are available on the workshop's web page: http://iserp.columbia.edu/workshop/workshop-20th-century-politics-and-so...

Note we are back at the Lehman Center. The meeting will be held at 4:20 PM, in the Lehman Center, Room 406 IAB, 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027.

4:20-6:20pm
 
 
 
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Summer Lindsey (Columbia)

Summer Lindsey (Columbia)

October 18, 2017

Event Type: 

Summer Lindsey (Columbia) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. This is a practice job talk. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
"America's Inequality Trap: The Inequality Reinforcing Effects of Status Quo Bias and Inegalitarian Policymaking"

"America's Inequality Trap: The Inequality Reinforcing Effects of Status Quo Bias and Inegalitarian Policymaking"

October 19, 2017

Location: 

509 Knox Hall 606 W. 122nd Street NY NY 10027

Event Type: 

Center for Wealth and Inequality (CWI) Seminar Series

Department of Sociology

Speaker: Nathan J. Kelly
Department of Political Science, University of Tennessee

Talk Title: "America's Inequality Trap: The Inequality Reinforcing Effects of Status Quo Bias and Inegalitarian Policymaking"

 
 
 
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Institutional Review Board (IRB) ​Information Session for Social Scientists

Institutional Review Board (IRB) ​Information Session for Social Scientists

October 23, 2017
10:00am-11:00am

Location: 

Room 270B International Affairs Building

Event Type: 

Institutional Review Board (IRB) ​Information Session for Social Scientists

​Dear Social Scientist,​

You are cordially invited to attend an Institutional Review Board (IRB) ​Information Session for Social Scientists on ​Monday, ​October 23rd from 10am-11am. Staff from the Human Research Protection Office will provide an overview of the IRB process with specifics for researchers in the social sciences. There will be time for questions. Light refreshments will be served.

​WHEN: Monday, October 23rd, 2017

TIME: 10:00am-11:00am

WHERE: ​270B International Affairs Building, directions can be found here.

Please RSVP by 10/19.

10:00am-11:00am
 
Divya Subramanian (History), “Modernization in Decline: India’s Upper Krishna Irrigation Project, 1964-present”

Divya Subramanian (History), “Modernization in Decline: India’s Upper Krishna Irrigation Project, 1964-present”

October 24, 2017
4:00-5:00 PM : Presentation 5:00-6:00 PM Reception & Food

Location: 

Lindsay Rogers Room (Room 707) 7th floor International Affairs Building

Event Type: 

Summary: “What happens to development projects when international capital and experts have left the building? In 1964, construction began on the Upper Krishna Project, an irrigation works in the Indian state of Karnataka; fifty years and several highly-publicized rounds of World Bank funding later, the project’s main dam collapsed, sending six billion cubic feet of water rushing through in its wake. Examining the rise and demise of the Upper Krishna Project provides insight into the dynamics of deindustrialization and infrastructural decay across the former colonial periphery.”

Contact information: iserp-igss@columbia.edu

4:00-5:00 PM : Presentation 5:00-6:00 PM Reception & Food
 
“There’s a DiscoBall Between Us: Ethnography of an Idea”

“There’s a DiscoBall Between Us: Ethnography of an Idea”

October 25, 2017
4:10pm

Location: 

Room 963, Schermerhorn Extension

Event Type: 

Columbia University

Department of Anthropology

together with

The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP) and The Institute for Research in African-American Studies (IRAAS)

Cordially invite you to attend a

FRANZ BOAS SEMINAR

with

Dr. Jafari Allen

University of Miami

“There’s a DiscoBall Between Us: Ethnography of an Idea”

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017

4:10pm

Room 963, Schermerhorn Extension

Reception to Follow in the Robert F. Murphy/Morton H. Fried

Department of Anthropology Lounge

Room 465, Schermerhorn Extension

 

Columbia University, Department of Anthropology

1200 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10027

Phone: 212-854-4552 Fax: 212-854-7347

4:10pm
 
Dorothy Kronick (Penn)

Dorothy Kronick (Penn)

October 25, 2017

Event Type: 

Dorothy Kronick (Penn) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
Rethinking the Emergence of the Yoruba as a Community of Practice, ca. 300 BC–AD 1200

Rethinking the Emergence of the Yoruba as a Community of Practice, ca. 300 BC–AD 1200

October 26, 2017
6.10-8pm

Location: 

Anthropology Department: Sheldon Scheps Memorial Library, Room 457 Schermerhorn Extension

Event Type: 

Akin Ogundiran, University of North Carolina - Charlotte

Abstract

In this presentation, I use a suite of sources--archaeology, oral traditions, and historical linguistics--to make the case for a deep-time history of the emergent principles that defined the Yoruba as a community of practice between ca. 300 BC and AD 1200.  Yes, it is another story of “being and becoming” but my collage of narratives and structural analyses offers ideas and conclusions that are different from the canonical stories of origins that currently dominate Yoruba historiography. Here, I focus on four principles that I consider most important in shaping the long-term Yoruba historical experience: (1) the ilé (House) as the building block of social organization; (2) the dyadic ìlú/oba-aládé (urban/divine kingship) as the model of political culture and ideology of governance; (3) the institutionalization of gendered duality as the epistemological framework for constructing social order; and (4) the quest for immortality through ancestral veneration. The regional and sub-continental contexts in which these core principles unfolded will be emphasized throughout. This study is the first of a nine-chapter book manuscript on the long-term history of the Yoruba community of practice from 300 BC to AD 1830. It offers a fodder of contemplation regarding how the ancestral Yoruba expanded from their Niger-Benue Confluence homeland to become, within about a thousand years, the largest cultural/language group in West Africa south of River Niger. The study also raises questions about the social experience of time and the implications for writing about time and periodization in African historiography. 

Please email Evin for the pre-circulated paper at efg2122@columbia.edu

Biography

Akin Ogundiran earned his Ph.D. in archaeological studies at Boston University. He is also a graduate of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife and University of Ibadan, both in Nigeria. He is currently a Professor of Africana Studies, Anthropology & History at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte where he also serves as chair of the Africana Studies Department. His research interests privilege archaeology, material culture, and historical ethnography, as well as embodied practices, orality, and mythos to understand the long-term multiscalar networks that framed community, household lives, and cultural formations in the Yoruba world in continental, global, and Black Atlantic contexts. Most of his previous archaeological research projects have focused on the emergent communities at the periphery and frontiers of hegemonic states. He has also collaborated on projects that examine the archaeology of modernity in Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora. He is completing a book manuscript on Yoruba cultural history and is leading a long-term interdisciplinary field project that is examining the political economy, settlement ecology, and cultural history of the Old Oyo Empire in West Africa. Dr. Ogundiran has received support for his research from many sources including the Social Science Research Council, Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, National Endowment for the Humanities, Dumbarton Oaks, and the National Humanities Center. 

Additional information about the event and the series available here

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