April 2017

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Ora John Reuter (UW-Milwaukee)

Ora John Reuter (UW-Milwaukee)

April 05, 2017

Event Type: 

Ora John Reuter (UW-Milwaukee) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
BEN HAYDEN, "NEURONAL FOUNDATIONS OF ECONOMIC VALUE"

BEN HAYDEN, "NEURONAL FOUNDATIONS OF ECONOMIC VALUE"

April 06, 2017
6:00pm - 7:30pm

Location: 

301 Uris Hall New York, NY 10027 United States

Event Type: 

Value is a central concept in economic theory and in neuroeconomics. Nonetheless, we have only recently begun to understand how the brain evaluates options and compares values to make beneficial choices. These processes appear to involve the coordinated action of multiple prefrontal and striatal regions acting together. Our work suggests that value is an emergent process that depends on the coordinated action of component processes, including memory, executive control, and action selection.

6:00pm - 7:30pm
 
 
 
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"Indigenous History in Christian Texts: Nahua Plays and Pictorial Catechisms"

"Indigenous History in Christian Texts: Nahua Plays and Pictorial Catechisms"

April 10, 2017
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Location: 

International Affairs Building - ISERP Conference Room 270B

Event Type: 

Louise M Burkhart, University at Albany (NY) 6pm-8pm, 10 April 2017 International Affairs Building - ISERP Conference Room 270B (directions here).

Abstract: Nahuas living under colonial rule produced a huge trove of documents in many genres, divided by scholars into a “mundane” or “notarial” corpus, including annals, wills, primordial titles, and other materials, and a religious or doctrinal corpus. Historians have worked primarily with the former, but religious texts also inscribe historical statements. This presentation will highlight two colonial religious genres: catechisms presented in a reinvented pictographic writing and religious dramas that stage biblical or hagiographic stories as Nahuatl-language community theater. Both genres undermine colonizing discourses by asserting a competence as Christians generally denied by Spanish authorities, promoting an indigenized Christianity, and aligning Nahua communities with divine authority. In this historical imaginary Nahuas retain cosmic centrality and fidelity to their forebears, sidelining the role of Spanish colonial agents.

Pre-circulated paper available here.

Biography: Louise Burkhart is professor and chair of the department of Anthropology at the University of Albany, SUNY. She is the author of The Slippery Earth: Nahua-Christian Moral Dialogue in Sixteenth-Century Mexico (1989), the multivolume Nahuatl Theater (2004-2009), and Painted Words: Nahua Catholicism, Politics, and Memory in the Atzaqualco Pictorial Catechism (2016) among many other books and articles. Through her work, she investigates the ways in which indigenous Mexicans experienced, engaged with, and manipulated the Christian texts and teachings introduced under Spanish colonial rule, focusing primarily with materials in the Nahuatl (Aztec) language. Her latest research examines pictographic inscriptions of Nahuatl-language Christian doctrine, debunking the conventional view of these texts (known as Testerian manuscripts) as early missionary tools, by arguing that later-colonial native elites invented these new forms of writing for the purpose of political legitimation.

Additional information about this workshop series may be found here and here.

The Undocumented Series is sponsored by ISERP and the Center for Archaeology.

Speaker: 

Louise Burkhart

Professor - Anthropology
6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
 
 
Tariq Thachil (Vanderbilt)

Tariq Thachil (Vanderbilt)

April 12, 2017

Event Type: 

Tariq Thachil (Vanderbilt) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
 
 
 
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Daniel Slater (Chicago)

Daniel Slater (Chicago)

April 19, 2017

Event Type: 

Daniel Slater (Chicago) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

April 19, 2017

Location: 

The Heyman Center - The Common Room (2nd Floor)

Event Type: 

Columbia University - Department of Anthropology Announces the Ruth Benedict Lectures: 

TALAL ASAD
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
City University of New York
“Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics”

Lecture One
Wednesday, April 19, 2017
4:10pm-6:00pm
The Heyman Center
The Common Room (2nd floor)
http://heymancenter.org/visit/

 

These lectures are made possible through the generous funding of the of the Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, Columbia University

 
The Consequences of Income Segregation between School Districts for Economic and Racial Achievement Gaps

The Consequences of Income Segregation between School Districts for Economic and Racial Achievement Gaps

April 20, 2017
2:00-3:30pm

Event Type: 

Center for Wealth and Inequality (CWI) Seminar Series | Department of Sociology

Knox Hall Rm 509 | 2:00 p.m.
Thursday, April 20

Ann Owens, Department of Sociology, University of Southern California, Dornsife
Title: The Consequences of Income Segregation between School Districts for Economic and Racial Achievement Gaps

2:00-3:30pm
 
"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

April 20, 2017

Location: 

The Heyman Center - The Common Room (2nd Floor)

Event Type: 

Columbia University - Department of Anthropology Announces the Ruth Benedict Lectures: 

TALAL ASAD
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
City University of New York
“Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics”

Lecture Two
Thursday, April 20, 2016
4:10pm-6:00pm
The Heyman Center
The Common Room (2nd floor)
http://heymancenter.org/visit/

These lectures are made possible through the generous funding of the of the Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, Columbia University
 

 
"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

April 21, 2017

Location: 

963 Schermerhorn Extension

Event Type: 

Columbia University - Department of Anthropology Announces the Ruth Benedict Lectures: 

TALAL ASAD
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
City University of New York
“Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics”

Anthropology Graduate Students Seminar with Talal Asad
Friday, April 21, 2017
10:00am-12:00pm
963 Schermerhon Extension

These lectures are made possible through the generous funding of the of the Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, Columbia University

 
"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

"Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics"

April 21, 2017

Location: 

Room 501 Schermerhorn

Event Type: 

Columbia University - Department of Anthropology Announces the Ruth Benedict Lectures: 

TALAL ASAD
Distinguished Professor Emeritus
City University of New York
“Reflections on Secularization, Ritual and Politics”

Lecture Three
Friday, April 21, 2017
4:10pm-6:00pm
Room 501 Schermerhorn

These lectures are made possible through the generous funding of the of the Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, Columbia University

 
 
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Nahomi Ichino (UMich-Ann Arbor)

Nahomi Ichino (UMich-Ann Arbor)

April 26, 2017

Event Type: 

Nahomi Ichino (UMich-Ann Arbor) will be presenting at the Columbia University Comparative Politics Seminar. The seminar meets from 12.15 to 1.45pm in IAB 707.

 
Cognition and Decision Seminar Series

Cognition and Decision Seminar Series

April 27, 2017

Location: 

Uris 301

Event Type: 

The Cognition and Decision Seminar Series presents

Dr. Peter Dayan
University College London

Betwixt fast and slow: Integrating model-free and model-based decision-making

Behavioural and neural evidence reveals a retrospective, model-free or habitual process that caches returns previously garnered from available choices, and a prospective, model-based or goal-directed one that putatively relies on mental simulation of the environment. There is much current interest in understanding how these faster and slower systems are integrated to take advantage of the beneficial computational properties of each. I will discuss current theoretical and experimental approaches on the resulting architecture of choice, and note some pressing concerns.

Uris 301

 
 
 
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