March 2020

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Celebrating Recent Work by Rashid Khalidi

Celebrating Recent Work by Rashid Khalidi

March 04, 2020
6:15 PM

Location: 

Kellogg Center, IAB Room 1501

Event Type: 

The New Books in Arts and Sciences Series Presents:

Celebrating New Work by Rashid Khalidi

March 4, 2020, 6:15 PM

The Kellogg Center, IAB Room 1501

The Hundred Years' War on Palestine: A History of Settler Colonialism and Resistance, 1917-2017

A landmark history of one hundred years of war waged against the Palestinians from the foremost US historian of the Middle East, told through pivotal events and family history

In 1899, Yusuf Diya al-Khalidi, mayor of Jerusalem, alarmed by the Zionist call to create a Jewish national home in Palestine, wrote a letter aimed at Theodore Herzl: the country had an indigenous people who would not easily accept their own displacement. He warned of the perils ahead, ending his note, “in the name of God, let Palestine be left alone.” Thus Rashid Khalidi, al-Khalidi’s great-great-nephew, begins this sweeping history, the first general account of the conflict told from an explicitly Palestinian perspective.

Drawing on a wealth of untapped archival materials and the reports of generations of family members—mayors, judges, scholars, diplomats, and journalists—The Hundred Years' War on Palestine upends accepted interpretations of the conflict, which tend, at best, to describe a tragic clash between two peoples with claims to the same territory. Instead, Khalidi traces a hundred years of colonial war on the Palestinians, waged first by the Zionist movement and then Israel, but backed by Britain and the United States, the great powers of the age. He highlights the key episodes in this colonial campaign, from the 1917 Balfour Declaration to the destruction of Palestine in 1948, from Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon to the endless and futile peace process.

Original, authoritative, and important, The Hundred Years' War on Palestine is not a chronicle of victimization, nor does it whitewash the mistakes of Palestinian leaders or deny the emergence of national movements on both sides. In reevaluating the forces arrayed against the Palestinians, it offers an illuminating new view of a conflict that continues to this day.


About the Author:

Rashid Khalidi received his BA from Yale in 1970, and his D.Phil. from Oxford in 1974. He is editor of the Journal of Palestine Studies, and was President of the Middle East Studies Association, and an advisor to the Palestinian delegation to the Madrid and Washington Arab-Israeli peace negotiations from October 1991 until June 1993. He is author of: Brokers of Deceit: How the U.S. has Undermined Peace in the Middle East (2013); Sowing Crisis: American Dominance and the Cold War in the Middle East (2009);The Iron Cage: The Story of the Palestinian Struggle for Statehood (2006); Resurrecting Empire: Western Footprints and America's Perilous Path in the Middle East (2004); Palestinian Identity: The Construction of Modern National Consciousness (1996); Under Siege: PLO Decision-Making During the 1982 War (1986); British Policy Towards Syria and Palestine, 1906-1914 (1980); and co-editor ofPalestine and the Gulf (1982) and The Origins of Arab Nationalism (1991).

About the Speakers:

Manan Ahmed, Associate Professor, is a historian of South Asia and the littoral western Indian Ocean world from 1000-1800 CE. His areas of specialization include intellectual history in South and Southeast Asia; critical philosophy of history, colonial and anti-colonial thought. He is interested in how modern and pre-modern historical narratives create understandings of places, communities, and intellectual genealogies for their readers.

Gil Hochberg is Ransford Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature, and Middle East Studies at Columbia University. Her research focuses on the intersections among psychoanalysis, postcolonial theory, nationalism, gender and sexuality. She has published essays on a wide range of issues including: Francophone North African literature, Palestinian literature, the modern Levant, gender and nationalism, cultural memory and immigration, memory and gender, Hebrew Literature, Israeli and Palestinian Cinema, Mediterraneanism, Trauma and Narrative. 

Rosie Bsheer is a historian of the modern Middle East. Her teaching and research interests center on Arab intellectual and social movements, petro-capitalism and state formation, and the production of historical knowledge and commemorative spaces. She is currently finishing up a book manuscript, provisionally entitled, Archive Wars: Spectacle, Speculation, and the Politics of History in Saudi Arabia (under contract with Stanford University Press). She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on oil and empire, social and intellectual movements, petro-modernity, political economy, historiography, and the making of the modern Middle East. She is Associate Producer of the 2007 Oscar-nominated film My Country, My Country, Co-Editor of Jadaliyya E-zine, and Associate Editor of Tadween Publishing.

About the Chair:

Nadia Abu El-Haj is Professor in the Departments of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University, and Co-Director of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia. The recipient of numerous awards, including from the Social Science Research Council, the Wenner Gren Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the Harvard Academy for Area and International Studies, the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, she is the author of numerous journal articles published on topics ranging from the history of archaeology in Palestine to the question of race and genomics today.


Sponsored by: The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, The Office of the Divisional Dean of Social Science, The Center for Palestine Studies, and the Heyman Center for the Humanities.

6:15 PM
 
 
PER Mini Course – Sanjeev Goyal, Professor of Economics, University of Cambridge

PER Mini Course – Sanjeev Goyal, Professor of Economics, University of Cambridge

March 06, 2020

Event Type: 

To find out more, click here

 
 
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Jonny Bunning (University of Chicago) at the Workshop on 20th Century Politics and Society

Jonny Bunning (University of Chicago) at the Workshop on 20th Century Politics and Society

March 12, 2020
4:20-6:00

Location: 

Lindsay Rogers Room, 707 IAB

Event Type: 

Jonny Bunning (University of Chicago, Society of Fellows) will join the workshop on March 12, 2020 to present "Redoing the Demos: The Birth of Gary Becker and the Anti-Malthusian Origins of Human Capital at Chicago, 1950-1965."

4:20-6:00
 
CANCELED - Bombay and Indian Ocean Urbanisms

CANCELED - Bombay and Indian Ocean Urbanisms

March 13, 2020 to March 14, 2020
Friday 5:00-7:30 PM Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00PM

Location: 

The Heyman Center Common Room

Event Type: 

Bombay and Indian Ocean Urbanisms

March 13, 5 PM -  March 14, 6 PM

The Heyman Center Common Room

During the nineteenth century, Bombay was India’s leading steam-shipping port and held the unique position of sending people, capital, cultural practices, and new ideas about urbanism and working-class culture across the ocean. However, since the 1960s, Bombay has become increasingly decentered and has given way to city-states such as Singapore and Hong Kong, which are organized around new capital flows such as real estate speculation and container shipping. We seek to understand this shift by examining the maritime and historical roots of contemporary urban Bombay and the endurance of these roots during the remaking of built and social formations in other Indian Ocean cities. Little is known about the endurance of these roots and exchanges that may underpin the twenty-first century Asian city because scholarship on colonial and post-colonial urbanism has largely overlooked these cities’ maritime pasts. This conference intervenes in and connects the fields of Urban and Indian Ocean Studies by studying Bombay comparatively with other Indian Ocean cities. Our conference takes the nodal centrality of Bombay as a place from which to explore the specificity, stakes, and consequences of what might be termed “Indian Ocean urbanisms.” Thus, we ask: how did Indian Ocean cities constitute each other? What ocean-wide mental and material structures allowed urban forms and practices to move between port cities, and how did they persist and change with colonial and post-colonial governance? How does this shared past continue to shape contemporary urbanism and the new Asian regional economy?

There is a long and well-established tradition of addressing the Atlantic World as a connected system, especially through the slave trade and its interconnections across Africa, Europe, and the New World. If studies of the Atlantic have shown enduring material and mental formations of the ocean created by the slave trade and consequent diasporas, Indian Ocean scholarship can reveal enduring social worlds created by long-standing networks of kin and capital. This is the first conference of its kind to highlight Bombay’s importance as a center of movement and commerce across the Indian Ocean and the distinctive spatial orders this produced; to analyze Bombay beyond its colonial status; and to connect emerging work on the Indian Ocean region with scholarship on the Atlantic and Pacific regions. Nine selected presentations will focus on change and continuity in Bombay’s urban life as a result of ongoing relationships with other Indian Ocean cities of Singapore, Yangon, Manama, and Dar es Salaam. The papers showcase new ways of reading Bombay’s urbanism: as shaped by shared itineraries of design aesthetics and planning policy (and the experts behind them); as a configured   organization of environmental and climate knowledge, especially the monsoons; as a site of anticolonial internationalism and alternative to Bandung; and as a built form funded by merchant families spread across the Indian Ocean network. The presentations intervene methodologically by drawing on the methods of urban history, labor history, and science and technology studies to study oceanic networks. However, what is distinctive to this enterprise is its focus on the scale of the urban, the relationship between built form, visual cultures, and social life, and the organization of economic life, which continue to shape the relationship between ocean and city. We take built form to be a materialization of capital flows and an important trace of the social lives of labor and community across the Indian Ocean. We wager that comparison across hierarchies of urban order will allow us to consider the place of Indian Ocean urbanism during this moment of resurgence across East Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

Funded by ISERP, the Weatherhead East Asian Institute and the Center for Science and Society, Center for the Study of Social Difference, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and the History Department.

Faculty organizers: Anupama P. Rao (Barnard History and MESAAS, Columbia), Amy Chazkel (History, Columbia)

Graduate Student organizers: Laura Yan (History, Columbia), Sohini Chattopadhyay (History, Columbia). 

More information here.

Friday 5:00-7:30 PM Saturday 10:00 AM - 6:00PM
 
 
 
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POSTPONED - Department of Anthropology Fourth Annual Ruth Benedict Lectures: The Viable and the Bearable

POSTPONED - Department of Anthropology Fourth Annual Ruth Benedict Lectures: The Viable and the Bearable

March 23, 2020
4:10 PM

Location: 

Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall

Event Type: 

Due to Columbia's COVID-19 response, this event has been postponed until further notice.

4:10 PM
 
 
POSTPONED - Department of Anthropology Fourth Annual Ruth Benedict Lectures: The Management of Colonial Inheritances

POSTPONED - Department of Anthropology Fourth Annual Ruth Benedict Lectures: The Management of Colonial Inheritances

March 25, 2020
4:10 PM

Location: 

Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall

Event Type: 

Due to Columbia's COVID-19 response, this event has been postponed until further notice.

4:10 PM
 
CANCELED - Just Societies Speaker Series: Bruce Western

CANCELED - Just Societies Speaker Series: Bruce Western

March 26, 2020
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM EDT

Location: 

The East Gallery, Maison Française, 515 West 116th Street Buell Hall New York, New York 10027

Event Type: 

Due to Columbia University coronaviris response policies, this event has been canceled.

The Division of Social Science is proud to present the Just Societies Speaker Series, one of the signature initiatives of Dean Fredrick Harris.

These lectures spotlight the research of outstanding scholars working on a range of important issues, including mass incarceration, marginalized communities and the legal system, and the social impacts of climate change.

All events are free and open to the public. Guests are encouraged to RSVP to reserve seats.

We hope to see you this semester!

Bruce Western
Bryce Professor of Sociology and Social Justice
Columbia University
Homeward: Life in the Year After Prison
March 26, 2020, 4:00pm-5:30pm
The East Gallery, Maison Française

Speaker: 

Bruce Western

Bryce Professor of Sociology and Social Justice
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM EDT
 
POSTPONED - Fourth Annual Ruth Benedict Lectures: Sub-viving

POSTPONED - Fourth Annual Ruth Benedict Lectures: Sub-viving

March 27, 2020
4:10

Location: 

Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall

Event Type: 

Due to Columbia's COVID-19 response, this event has been postponed until further notice.

4:10
 
 
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