Sociology

Filter this result by content type

Jessica T. Simes

Adjunct Associate Research Scholar

Collaborative Research: Pennsylvania Solitary Confinement Study

The U.S. penal population is the largest in the world, but imprisonment in America is also distinguished by its extensive use of solitary confinement, defined as incarceration in a cell for 23 hours each day with limited access to visits from outsiders or rehabilitative programs. Solitary confinement is an important but understudied part of the experience of punishment in the United States. The scant available evidence suggests solitary confinement is associated with poor health and adjustment to society after incarceration.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: The Autonomy of Adults with Developmental Disabilities

Recent reforms in services for people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) have been oriented toward increasing the individual's opportunity for autonomy and a normal life in the community. However, adults with ID/DD show poor outcomes on almost all indicators of successful adulthood. This project examines the influence of the tension between the need for care and encouragement of autonomy on the adult lives of people with ID/DD.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Formation of Ethnoracial Identity

This project investigates the processes by which children of new groups integrate into American society. More specifically, it focuses on the individual and group-level identity-formation processes central to their incorporation. This study will expand knowledge of these fast-growing but little-studied groups, especially of how they are transitioning to new patterns of life.

The Boston Reentry Study: Analysis and Preparation of Public Use Data

In an era of historically high US incarceration rates, the transition from prison to the community of released prisoners has had far-reaching effects on the population and poverty dynamics of neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage. Despite a large body of research studying the effects of incarceration, relatively few studies have analyzed in detail the process of leaving prison and entering a community.

Pages

Subscribe to Sociology

Newsletter

Don't want to miss our interesting news and updates! Make sure to join our newsletter list.

* indicates required

Contact us

For general questions about ISERP programs, services, and events.