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Law

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Doctoral Dissertation Research: Governing the Uncommons: The Impact of Technological Change on International Law

The idea that law struggles to keep pace with technological change has in recent years become a trope. New technologies convey social benefits but also unexpected potential harm. This is particularly troubling in the context of international law, where military technological breakthroughs can disrupt multilateral consensus about who owes whom what. Puzzlingly, old laws are often robust to disruptive technological change, even when there are strong incentives for powerful parties to push for overhaul.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Forgive Us Our Debts: Market Expansion, Ethno-Racial Boundaries, and the Democratization of Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy has long been a locus of struggle over whom is morally worthy of an economic rebirth. Early twentieth century America, as a key period of expanding credit markets and the institutionalization of bankruptcy, wrestled with these tensions. In particular, the Bankruptcy Act of 1898 unexpectedly resulted in skyrocketing personal bankruptcy filing rates, which helped to solidify the perception of bankruptcy as a means for the working person?s economic rebirth.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: On Terror and Trauma: Governance, Law and Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome

While contestation of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder paradigm is as old as the diagnostic category itself, the debate about what PTSD is and how to compensate victims remains unsolved to this day. Existing scholarship has examined how community organizing for compensation rights by Vietnam veterans, rape survivors, and high-risk workers has influenced the recognition of PTSD as a diagnostic category. But the intertwined juridical and scientific procedures through which PTSD evidence is indeed produced have received scant attention from the social sciences.

To Conduct Research on Improving Court Appearances

LJAF remains committed to helping criminal justice professionals improve their knowledge of “what works” to increase community safety, equity, and fairness in the justice system. Through this Request for Proposals (RFP), LJAF will provide funding to selected researchers to conduct rigorously designed research studies that answer lingering questions about improving court appearance alongside other outcomes for justice-involved individuals.

Deadline: 

Friday, January 11, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Comparing Multi-Scalar Claims for Redress and Reparation

In the second half of the twentieth century, claims for redress for historical injustices have put increasing pressure on political and legal systems. This pressure is compounded by the fact that claims for reparations may occur simultaneously at international and national levels. The research supported by this award asks how international claims for redress converge on or diverge from national claims for redress from local governments.

Interdisciplinary Research Projects

The Center for the Study of Social Difference at Columbia University (CSSD) is an interdisciplinary research center supporting collaborative projects that address gender, race, sexuality, and other forms of inequality to foster ethical and progressive social change. The Center’s work has two overarching research streams: “Women Creating Change” and “Imagining Justice.”

Deadline: 

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Building Trust and Mutual Respect to Improve Health Care

The 2017 Building Trust and Mutual Respect to Improve Health Care call for proposals (CFP) will fund empirical research studies to help us better understand how to build trust and mutual respect to meet vulnerable patients’ health care needs. For this CFP, we would define vulnerable populations in a number of different ways, including the economically disadvantaged, diverse racial and ethnic populations, the uninsured, older adults, homeless individuals, and people with complex health and social needs (including people with acute behavioral health needs or multiple chronic conditions).

Deadline: 

Friday, October 13, 2017

Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of Genomics Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant Program (R21)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21) applications that propose to study the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of human genome research. These applications should propose single or mixed methods studies that break new ground, extend previous discoveries in new directions or develop preliminary data in preparation for larger studies. Of particular interest are studies that explore the implications of new or emerging genomic technologies or novel uses of genomic information.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of Genomics Small Research Grant Program (R03)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) invites Small Research Grant (R03) applications to study the ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) of human genome research. These applications should be for small, self-contained research projects, such as those that involve single investigators. Of particular interest are projects that propose normative or conceptual analyses, including focused legal, economic, philosophical, anthropological, or historical analyses of new or emerging issues.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, June 16, 2020

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