Social Science

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Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health Research Grant (R01)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigators to submit research grant applications that will identify, develop, test, evaluate and/or refine strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based practices (e.g. behavioral interventions; prevention, early detection, diagnostic, treatment and disease management interventions; quality improvement programs) into public health, clinical practice, and community settings. In addition, studies to advance dissemination and implementation research methods and measures are encouraged.

Deadline: 

Friday, June 5, 2020
Monday, October 5, 2020
Friday, February 5, 2021
Monday, June 7, 2021
Tuesday, October 5, 2021
Monday, February 7, 2022

Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant (R21)

This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages investigators to submit research grant applications that will identify, develop, test, evaluate and/or refine strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based practices (e.g. behavioral interventions; prevention, early detection, diagnostic, treatment and disease management interventions; quality improvement programs) into public health, clinical practice, and community settings. In addition, studies to advance dissemination and implementation research methods and measures are encouraged.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, June 16, 2020
Friday, October 16, 2020
Tuesday, February 16, 2021
Wednesday, June 16, 2021
Monday, October 18, 2021
Wednesday, February 16, 2022

Dissertation Scholarships

To support graduate students and their dissertation research.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Dissertation Fellowships

To support dissertation research in the social sciences.

Deadline: 

Sunday, December 15, 2019

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Homeward Bound: Return Migration and Post-Conflict Governance

This dissertation examines the political impact of return migration after civil war. Violence wrought by civil war forces millions of people to flee their homes. While scholars have demonstrated how these population movements can spread and exacerbate conflict, return-migration is assumed to be a purely logistical issue. Once the war is over, people will simply return home and pick up where they left off. Yet, conflict between returning and non-migrant populations is a nearly ubiquitous issue for post-conflict societies from South Sudan to Iraq and Rwanda.

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