National Science Foundation

Filter this result by content type

Unemployment Insurance Schemes in Developing Countries

This proposed research project will study the most efficient form of unemployment support using a large data set on the employment history of over 400,000 workers. This employment data will be combined with expenditure and unemployment compensation data for the study. The researchers will categorize different types of unemployment compensation (unemployment insurance, lump sum payments, and no insurance) and use sophisticated methods to analyze how the type of unemployment compensation unemployed workers receive affects affect their consumption over time.

The Emergence of Symbolic Notation and Data Visualization in Algebra and Chemistry

This award supports doctoral dissertation research in history of science that focuses on the use of mathematical and chemical symbolism. Such notation is currently regarded as essential to scientific work. By contrast, for much of Western European history, the use of symbols in science was not regarded as a suitable approach. However, by the nineteenth century, symbolic notation had become ubiquitous. This project's objective is to explain why European scientists came to see symbolic notation as credible during the early modern period.

The Boston Reentry Study: Analysis and Preparation of Public Use Data

In an era of historically high US incarceration rates, the transition from prison to the community of released prisoners has had far-reaching effects on the population and poverty dynamics of neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage. Despite a large body of research studying the effects of incarceration, relatively few studies have analyzed in detail the process of leaving prison and entering a community.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: The Distributive Properties of the Bureaucracy

The hiring of public sector employees is an important part of the bureaucratic process. Political incentives to target government jobs to certain populations or constituencies have the potential to influence the manner in which these jobs, as well as public goods, are distributed. Thus, understanding the distribution of bureaucratic jobs can provide insight into the functioning of governance. The project will examine interactions between the legislature and bureaucracy, as well as constituent relations and political incentives, to study the distribution of bureaucratic jobs.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Reducing Religious Extremism Via Elite Persuasion

This project addresses three questions regarding persuasion and religious extremism among marginalized young adult men. It seeks to determine whether efforts on the part of influential group members can effectively persuade others to mitigate extremist attitudes and behavior. It studies this question in two important communities: among members of a majority religious group, as well among a minority religious group that perceives itself as victimized by the majority.

Doctoral Dissertation Research in Economics: Attention and Beliefs in Games: an Experiment

Game theory has become an indispensable tool in the analysis of strategic interactions between people, groups, and nations. It rests on Nash equilibrium as its central concept. In a Nash equilibrium, (1) each player?s action is best, given his or her beliefs over others? actions and (2) those beliefs are correct. However, even under the idealized conditions of laboratory experiments, there are systematic deviations from the predictions of classical game theory.

Standard Grant: The Role of Craft Skill in Scientific Practice

This award provides support for the Making and Knowing Project, a research initiative of the Center for Science and Society at Columbia University. The research brings together students, practitioners, scholars of the humanities and social sciences, natural scientists, and specialists from computer science and the digital humanities in formal university courses and a series of "expert crowdsourcing" workshops and working groups. The award will support further development of the project's collaborative and pedagogy-driven research methodology.

Collaborative Research: Science Policy Research Report: Government Brokerage of Innovation Networks

Federal agencies offer American innovators at least two different sources of support: first, seed money and consulting services that would be all but inaccessible to early stage entrepreneurs at competitive market prices; and second, introductions to potential partners in collaborative networks. Given that innovation demands collaboration as well as competition, the latter contributions are no less important than the former. But they are decidedly less well known and understood.

Geography and Spatial Sciences Program - Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Awards (GSS-DDRI)

The Geography and Spatial Sciences Program sponsors research on the geographic distributions and interactions of human, physical, and biotic systems on Earth. Investigators are encouraged to propose plans for research about the nature, causes, and consequences of human activity and natural environmental processes across a range of scales. Projects on a variety of topics qualify for support if they offer promise of contributing to scholarship by enhancing geographical knowledge, concepts, theories, methods, and their application to societal problems and concerns.

Geography and Spatial Sciences Program (GSS)

The Geography and Spatial Sciences Program sponsors research on the geographic distributions and interactions of human, physical, and biotic systems on Earth. Investigators are encouraged to propose plans for research about the nature, causes, and consequences of human activity and natural environmental processes across a range of scales. Projects on a variety of topics qualify for support if they offer promise of contributing to scholarship by enhancing geographical knowledge, concepts, theories, methods, and their application to societal problems and concerns.

Deadline: 

Thursday, September 6, 2018
Thursday, September 5, 2019
Thursday, September 3, 2020
Thursday, September 2, 2021
Thursday, September 1, 2022

Pages

Subscribe to National Science Foundation

Newsletter

Don't want to miss our interesting news and updates! Make sure to join our newsletter list.

Contact us

For general questions about ISERP programs, services, and events.