The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy is now open.  Our office hours are from: 9:00am - 5:00pm, Monday - Friday. Please refer to the COVID-19 Resource Guide for all matters related to the return to campus.  All visitors and vendors must fill out the Columbia University Health Screening Form.  We look forward to seeing you on campus.

ISERP Executive Committee

  • Marshall D Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy

    Timothy Frye (Ph.D., Columbia, 1997) is the Marshall D. Shulman Professor of Post-Soviet Foreign Policy and the Director of The Harriman Institute. Professor Frye received a B.A. in Russian language and literature from Middlebury College in 1986, an M.I.A. from Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs in 1992, and a Ph.D. from Columbia in 1997. His research and teaching interests are in comparative politics and political economy with a focus on the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. He is the author of Brokers and Bureaucrats: Building Markets in Russia, which won the 2001 Hewett Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, and Building States and Markets after Communism: The Perils of Polarized Democracy. Among other projects, he is working on a book manuscript, Property Rights and Property Wrongs: Institutions and Economic Development in Russia. He has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. He is also Director of the Center for the Study of Institutions and Development at State Research University-Higher Economics School, Moscow. Professor Frye is on leave for the 2015-2016 academic year.

  • Professor of Political Science; Dean of Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Director of the Center on African-American Politics and Society

    Fredrick C. Harris is Dean of Social Science and Professor of Political Science. He also serves as Director of the Center on African American Politics and Society.

    Professor Harris’s research interests are primarily in American politics with a focus on race and politics, political participation, social movements, religion and politics, political development, and African-American politics. His publications include Something Within: Religion in African American Political Activism, which was awarded the V.O. Key Book Award by the Southern Political Science Association, the Best Book Award by the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, and the Best Book Award by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists.

    He is also the co-author of Countervailing Forces in African-American Civic Activism,1973-1994, which received the W.E.B. DuBois Book Award from the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and the Ralph Bunche Award from the American Political Science Association. His article "It Takes a Tragedy to Arouse Them: Collective Memory and Collective Action during the Civil Rights Movement," published in Social Movement Studies: Journal of Social, Cultural, and Political Protest, received the Mary Parker Follet Award for best article by the American Political Science Association's section on Politics and History. He is co-editor with Cathy Cohen of the Oxford University Press book series "Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities."

    Professor Harris's most recent books are The Price of the Ticket: Barack Obama and the Rise and Decline of Black Politics (Oxford University Press, 2012), and, with Robert Lieberman, Beyond Discrimination: Racial Inequality in a Post-Racist Era (Russell Sage Foundation Press, 2013). The Price of the Ticket received the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Non-Fiction. His essays have appeared in Dissent, the London Review of Books, The New York Times, Society, Souls, Transition, and the Washington Post. Professor Harris has served as Vice President of the American Political Science Association. A non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, Professor Harris has also served as a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., and a Visiting Professor at the Pantheon-Sorbonne University in Paris.

  • Elizabeth A. Povinelli is the Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. Her writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism that would support an anthropology of the otherwise. Her first two books, Labor's Lot: The Power, History and Culture of Aboriginal Action (The University of Chicago Press, 1994) and The Cunning of Recognition: Indigenous Alterities and the Making of Australian Multiculturalism (Duke University Press, 2002), examine the governance of the otherwise in late liberal settler colonies from the perspective of the politics of recognition. Her last two books, Economies of Abandonment: Social Belonging and Endurance in Late Liberalism (Duke University Press, 2011) and The Empire of Love: Toward a Theory of Intimacy, Geneology, and Carnality. A Public Planet Book. (Duke University Press, 2006), examined the same from the perspective of intimacy, embodiment, and narrative form. Her ethnographic analysis is animated by a critical engagement with the traditions of American pragmatism and continental immanent theory.
  • Giddings Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of ISERP

    Thomas A. DiPrete is Giddings Professor of Sociology, co-director of the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP), co-director of the Center for the Study of Wealth and Inequality at Columbia University, and a faculty member of the Columbia Population Research Center. DiPrete holds a B.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has been on the faculty of the University of Chicago, Duke University, and the University of Wisconsin–Madison as well as Columbia. DiPrete’s research interests include social stratification, demography, education, economic sociology, and quantitative methodology. A specialist in comparative research, DiPrete has held research appointments at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin, the Social Science Research Center – Berlin, the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin, the VU University Amsterdam, the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the University of Amsterdam. His recent and ongoing projects include the study of gender differences in educational performance, educational attainment, and fields of study, the determinants of college persistence and dropout in the U.S., a comparative study of how educational expansion and the structure of linkages between education and the labor market contribute to earnings inequality in several industrialized countries, and the study of how social comparison processes affect the compensation of corporate executives.

  • Professor of History and Co-Director of ISERP

    Matthew Connelly, associate professor, works on the history of eugenics, migration, and birth control. His most recent book, Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population, has just been published by Harvard University Press. His research articles have appeared in such journals as Population and Development Review, Comparative Studies in Society and History, The International Journal of Middle East Studies, The American Historical Review, Journal of Global History, and Past & Present. He has also published commentary on international affairs in The Atlantic Monthly and The National Interest. He received his B.A. from Columbia(1990) and his Ph.D. from Yale (1997).

  • George Blumenthal Professor and Professor of International and Public Affairs
    Senior Vice Dean and Chief Academic Officer School of Professional Studies

    Sharyn O'Halloran is the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economy and Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University in New York City. A political scientist and economist by training, O’Halloran has written extensively on issues related to the political economy of international trade and finance, regulation and institutional reform, economic growth and democratic transitions, and the political representation of minorities.

    O’Halloran received a BA degree in economics and political science from University of California, San Diego. O’Halloran then went on to receive her MA and PhD, also from University of California, San Diego. Her work focuses on formal and quantitative methods and their application to politics, economics, and public policy.

    Her publications include Politics, Process and American Trade Policy (University of Michigan Press), Delegating Powers (Cambridge University Press), The Future of the Voting Rights Act (Russell Sage Foundation), as well as numerous journal articles on administrative procedures and agency design, with application to U.S. trade and financial regulatory policy, including those published in the American Journal of Political Science, the American Political Science Review, International Organization, Yale Law Journal, NYU Law Journal, and the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization.

  • International Macroeconomics, Macroeconomics, Monetary Economics Professor

    Martín Uribe is a Professor of Economics at Columbia University and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Previously he taught at Duke University and the University of Pennsylvania, and was a Staff Economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Uribe obtained a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago, an Master degree from CEMA (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and a BA degree from Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Cordoba, Argentina). His research focuses on international macroeconomics and the theory of monetary and fiscal policy. His work has been published in academic journals such as The American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and Econometrica and has received financial support from the National Science Foundation.

  • Associate Professor of History and of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health

    Dr. Samuel Kelton Roberts, Jr., PhD, is Associate Professor of History (Columbia University School of the Arts and Sciences) and Sociomedical Sciences (Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health), and is also a former Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS). Dr. Roberts writes, teaches, and lectures widely on African-American urban history, especially medicine, public health, and science and technology. His widely acclaimed book, Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation (University of North Carolina Press, 2009), is an exploration of the political economy of race and the modern American public health state between the late nineteenth century and the mid-twentieth century, a period which encompasses the overlapping and mutually-informed eras of Jim Crow segregation and modern American public health practice.
    Roberts currently is researching and writing a book-length project on the United States’s troubled history of race and recovery, examining the social and political history of heroin addiction treatment from the 1950s to the early 1990s. This project traces urban policy at the beginning of the postwar heroin epidemic, the emergence of therapeutic communities, the politics of state-run addiction rehabilitation facilities, the adoption of methadone maintenance treatment in the 1960s and 1970s, the emergence of “radical recovery” movements and harm reduction and syringe exchange in the 1980s and 1990s.
    In 2013-14, Dr. Roberts was the Policy Director of Columbia University’s newly inaugurated Justice Initiative (now the Columbia University Center for Justice) and was the editor of the Center’s first research publication Aging in Prison: Reducing Elder Incarceration and Promoting Public Safety (2015). At the Columbia University Center for Science and Society, he leads the Research Cluster for the Historical Study of Race, Inequality, and Health. He also is the co-editor of Columbia University Press’s book series in Race, Inequality, and Health. In 2018, Dr. Roberts launched the podcast series People Doing Interesting Stuff (PDIS) (available on iTunes and other podcasting platforms) in which he speaks with people working in public health and social justice, especially harm reduction, HIV/AIDS work, reproductive justice, and criminal justice reform.

Newsletter

Don't want to miss our interesting news and updates! Make sure to join our newsletter list.

* indicates required

Contact us

For general questions about ISERP programs, services, and events.