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October 2021

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Executive Education: Effective ways to increase vaccination rates

Executive Education: Effective ways to increase vaccination rates

September 27, 2021 to October 01, 2021
10:00AM - 12:00PM EST (New York) 4:00 - 6:00PM CAT (Johannesburg)

Location: 

Zoom Webinar. Registration Required.

Event Type: 

For leaders, decision-makers, strategists and implementers of vaccination campaigns in Africa and the developing world.

In the face of the Delta and Delta Plus variants, the lack of available COVID-19 vaccines in low- and middle- income countries pose a monumental problem. Less than 3% of Africans have received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine, a percentage that lags a long way behind the world (24.7%) and far behind the United States (54.7%). As COVID-19 vaccine supply issues are slowly addressed, it is important to take steps to bolster public trust in vaccinations. In an IPSOS study 43% of Africans surveyed said they would definitely get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine. In the same study, the  primary reason for declining vaccines when they do become available was a lack of information about vaccines. In countries with vaccine surplus, many governments are moving forward with lotteries to attempt to boost vaccine uptake. Greatly concerning is that amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the administration of standard childhood vaccines has declined. It is essential to address the reasons behind declining vaccination rates to find interventions to improve vaccine uptake for all diseases.

This executive education symposium is supported by ISERP, the Program in Vaccine Education at Columbia University's Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Faculty of Health Sciences at the Universtiy of the Witswatersrtand, and the US Coalition on Sustainability.


Daily topics and speaker list:

September 27 - Day 1: Current concerns with childhood vaccine uptake

Vaccination rates for many diseases have been stalling, and COVID-19 has only exacerbated this problem by overwhelming healthcare workers and delaying non-emergency medical visits. From the United States to Africa, studies have shown that childhood vaccination has been disrupted by the pandemic. Vaccine uptake is an issue that extends far beyond COVID-19 vaccines and must be urgently addressed to ensure that preventable illness and death is mitigated.

Moderator: Dr. Shabir Madhi, University of the Witswatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Lecturer: Dr. Larry Stanberry, Columbia University, New York City, USA
Panelists: Ms. Simone Carter, UNICEF
  Dr. Tanimola L. Akande, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

 

September 28 - Day 2: Addressing practical barriers is the best way to increase vaccination rates

 

As demonstrated by the unacceptable vaccination rates across Africa, the greatest barriers to vaccination are those that are practical, such as a lack of supply. Other examples of practical barriers include long or arduous distances to clinics and onerous appointment booking systems. Removing practical barriers allows those who wish to get vaccinated – the majority of persons – to act on those motivations. Solutions to practical hurdles must be locally focused and context-specific to increase effectiveness.

Moderator: Dr. Martin Veller, University of the Witwatersrand
Lecturer: Ms. Amanda McClelland, Resolve to Save Lives
Panelists: Dr. Clare Cutland, University of the Witwatersrand
  Dr. Raji Tajudeen, Africa Centre for Disease Control, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

 

September 29 - Day 3: Vaccine hesitancy: what makes COVID-19 vaccines different?

In 2019, the WHO announced that vaccine hesitancy – an expression used to encompass a multitude of reasons for why a lack of vaccination occurs despite the availability of vaccines – was a top 10 threat to global health. As fears around COVID-19 vaccine safety coupled with fears around the rise of the anti-vax movement, vaccine hesitancy became a phrase that is used commonly by scientists and the public alike. Due to the immediate threat of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the rapid development of COVID-19 vaccines, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy is a notable issue worthy of addressing. It is important to focus on the "wait and see" group, made up of persons who wish to see vaccine safety and efficacy on others before they themselves get vaccinated.  Studies have shown that efforts to directly challenge those who are skeptical towards vaccines do not increase vaccination rates. Rather than concentrating on disputing misinformation, energy should be focused on amplifying positive and accurate vaccine content. 

Moderator: Dr. Anya Schiffrin, Columbia University
Lecturer: Dr. Peter Hotez, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, USA
Panelists: Dr. Sara Cooper, South Africa Medical Research Council/University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
  Dr. Susan Rosenthal, Columbia University

  

September 30 - Day 4: Trusted voices must be used to relay social norms

Though there is variation internationally, current data suggests that recommendations from health workers carry the most weight in increasing vaccination rates. Simple adjustments in the language used to convey advice to patients can produce significant improvements in vaccination rates. Local norms and practices must always be taken into consideration in establishing efficacious communication that boosts vaccine uptake. For instance, community-level leaders may prove most effective in some cultures. 

Moderator: Dr. Wilmot James, Columbia University
Lecturer: Dr. Tariro Makadzange, Stanford University
Panelists: Dr. Janan Dietrich, University of the Witwatersrand
  Dr. Andrew Steenhoff, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania

 

October 1 - Day 5: Should the COVID-19 vaccine be mandated? In what circumstance? What incentives should be used?

 

Is it a violation of personal autonomy to require someone to receive a vaccination? As getting vaccinated protects society, is it within legal and ethical bounds to mandate that an employee or healthcare provider or student receives a vaccine? Are the COVID-19 vaccines different from other vaccines? Lastly, what incentives work (and what incentives are morally acceptable) in encouraging people to get vaccinated? 

Moderator: Dr. Phillip Larussa, Columbia University
Lecturer: Dr. Wafa El-Sadr, Columbia University
Panelists: Dr. Helen Rees, University of the Witwatersrand
  Dr. Marc Grodman, Columbia University
10:00AM - 12:00PM EST (New York) 4:00 - 6:00PM CAT (Johannesburg)
 
 
 
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Jeh Johnson - On the State of American Democracy

Jeh Johnson - On the State of American Democracy

October 14, 2021
12:00 - 1:30 pm ET

Location: 

Online Zoom webinar. Registration required.

Event Type: 

THE DONA AND CAROL HAMILTON DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES was established by Charles Hamilton, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, as an annual event hosted by the Department of Political Science to honor the life and work of his late wife, Dona, and daughter, Carol. The Lectures present distinguished speakers to address compelling topics on justice and fairness in our contemporary world.

Thursday, October 14, 2021
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. ET

Register Here

Keynote Speaker
JEH JOHNSON is a partner in the law firm of Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, LLP and the former Secretary of Homeland Security (2013-2017) and former General Counsel of the Department of Defense (2009- 2012). Earlier in his career, Johnson was General Counsel of the Department of the Air Force (1998-2001), and an Assistant United States Attorney in the Southern District of New York (1989-1991). Johnson is the 2018 recipient of the Ronald Reagan Peace Through Strength Award, presented at the Reagan Presidential Library, for “contribut[ing] greatly to the defense of our nation,” and “guiding us through turbulent times with courage and wisdom.” In private life, in addition to practicing law Johnson is now on the board of directors of Lockheed Martin, U.S. Steel, the Council on Foreign Relations, the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York City, the Center for a New American Security, and is a trustee of Columbia University.

Panelists
RICHARD BRIFFAULT is the Joseph P. Chamberlain Professor of Legislation at Columbia Law School. His research, writing, and teaching focus on state and local government law; the news media often turns to him for analysis of issues central to democracy and the political process such as campaign finance reform, government
ethics, gerrymandering, and fair elections. Briffault has written more than 75 law review and journal articles as well as books and monographs, including Dollars and Democracy: A Blueprint for Campaign Finance Reform and the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th editions of the casebook State and Local Government Law.

ESTER R. FUCHS is Professor of International and Public Affairs and Political Science and is the Director of the Urban and Social Policy Program at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She served as Special Advisor to the Mayor for Governance and Strategic Planning under New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg from 2001 to 2005. Professor Fuchs serves as Director of WhosOnTheBallot.org, an online voter engagement initiative for New York City.

Co-moderators
WILMOT JAMES is Senior Research Scholar at the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP), Columbia University. As a former Member of Parliament in South Africa and spokesman on health, Dr. James developed an enduring interest in global health security policy formulation. He also serves as a senior biosecurity consultant to the Washington, DC based Nuclear Threat Initiative. He was recently appointed to the G7 Global Partnership’s Africa Signature Initiative on Biosecurity.

ROBERT Y. SHAPIRO is the Wallace S. Sayre Professor of Government and Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is also President of The Academy of Political Science and Editor of Political Science Quarterly.

THIS EVENT IS SPONSORED BY Columbia University’s Department of Political Science in partnership with the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP), the Urban and Social Policy Program at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia Global Centers, and The Academy of Political Science.

12:00 - 1:30 pm ET
 
 
 
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From Understanding Inequality to Reducing Inequality

From Understanding Inequality to Reducing Inequality

October 28, 2021
12:00 - 1:30 PM ET

Location: 

Virtual event, registration required

Event Type: 

Register Here

How does a discipline move from investigating a problem to investigating responses? This question is at the heart of a new Special Collection of Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World, which explores ways for social scientists to move beyond describing and quantifying the problem of inequality and to focus instead on ways to reduce it. Social science excels at advancing our understanding of how much inequality exists, what its sources are, and what consequences ensue. But comparatively little research aims to build understanding of policies or programs that can reduce inequality.

In this dynamic virtual forum, From Understanding Inequality to Reducing Inequality, co-sponsored by the Institute of Human Development and Social Change at New York University (NYU), the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York (CUNY), the Center for the Study of Wealth and Inequality at Columbia University, and the William T. Grant Foundation, Special Collection authors and discussants will examine the potential of research to help build and strengthen efforts to address inequality, as well as delineate pathways through which research may lead to large-scale social change.


12:00 - 12:05 pm            Introductory Remarks

  • Elise Cappella, Vice Dean for Research, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

12:05 – 12:25 pm         Introduction to the Special Collection

12:25 - 12:45pm             Moderated Panel: Authors  

  • Prudence L. Carter, Sarah and Joseph Jr. Dowling Professor of Sociology, Brown University
  • Thomas DiPrete, Giddings Professor of Sociology, co-director of the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, and co-director of the Center for the Study of Wealth and Inequality at Columbia University
  • Brittany N. Fox-Williams, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Lehman College, CUNY
  • Adam Gamoran, President, William T. Grant Foundation (moderator)
  • Andrew Nalani, Doctoral Candidate in Applied Psychology, NYU Steinhardt
  • Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Courtney Sale Ross Professor of Globalization and Education, NYU Steinhardt and Co-Director, Global TIES for Children Center, NYU Steinhardt and NYU Abu Dhabi

12:50 - 1:20 pm             Moderated Panel: Discussants

  • Janet Gornick, Professor of Political Science and Sociology, and Director, Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality, CUNY Graduate Center (moderator)

1:20 – 1:30                     Wrap-Up

  • Erin Godfrey, Director of NYU’s Institute of Human Development and Social Change, Associate Professor of Applied Psychology, NYU Steinhardt

Register Here

12:00 - 1:30 PM ET
 
 
 
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