The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy is now open.  Our office hours are from: 9:00am - 5:00pm, Monday - Friday. Please refer to the COVID-19 Resource Guide for all matters related to the return to campus.  All visitors and vendors must fill out the Columbia University Health Screening Form.  We look forward to seeing you on campus.

Thursday, February 17, 2022

To filter, choose a category in the above drop-down, then click "Apply."
All day
 
 
Before 01
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Complex Issues: Pride: 1950s: People Had Parties

Complex Issues: Pride: 1950s: People Had Parties

February 17, 2022
6:30 - 8:30pm ET

Location: 

Virtual.

Event Type: 

This conversation explores the first episode of Pride, a six-part documentary series chronicling the fight for LGBTQ+ rights in the United States from the 1950s to the 2000s. Each episode is dedicated to a decade and directed by a different director. Kalin’s contribution — “1950s: People Had Parties” — is a “revealing look at the vibrant and full lives lived by queer people in the 1950s amidst a steep rise in governmental regulations against the LGBTQ+ community led by Senator Joseph McCarthy, who ushered in an era of government-sanctioned persecution,” according to FX Networks.

Find more information here.

Register for the event here.

6:30 - 8:30pm ET
 
Between Black Boxes and White Cubes: "Figuring" Vogue Femme in Rashaad Newsom's "Black Magic"

Between Black Boxes and White Cubes: "Figuring" Vogue Femme in Rashaad Newsom's "Black Magic"

February 17, 2022
6:30 pm ET

Location: 

Virtual.

Event Type: 

This talk will address Brooklyn-based black visual artist Rashaad Newsome’s recent work, “Black Magic” (2019), which included live performances in both New York City and Philadelphia, an exhibition of collage, sculpture and artificial intelligence at the Philadelphia Photo Art Center, and a black contemporary art-themed drag ball. I will focus on the artist’s desire to decenter the white cube (or gallery space) in his work, even as he links performance practices with drawing and sculpture through the use of technologies like motion capture and 3D printing. Finally, I will explore the artist’s choice to center LGBT people of color themselves within discourses of both performance and visual art, figuring them as creators rather than the source material for the “real” actors of (art) history.

Find more information here.

Register for this event here.

6:30 pm ET
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Newsletter

Don't want to miss our interesting news and updates! Make sure to join our newsletter list.

* indicates required

Contact us

For general questions about ISERP programs, services, and events.