May 2021

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PLAGUE AND PREJUDICE WITH SIMON SCHAMA

PLAGUE AND PREJUDICE WITH SIMON SCHAMA

May 09, 2021
7:00 PM GMT / 3PM EST

Location: 

ON ZOOM, VIRTUAL EVENT

Event Type: 

HADLEY FREEMAN, SIMON SCHAMA

CHAIR: JULIA NEUBERGER

09/05/2021 7:00 PM GMT / 3PM EST
ON ZOOM, VIRTUAL EVENT

Ticket Price : £7.50

GET TICKETS

7:00 PM GMT / 3PM EST
 
"THE SPIRIT OF FRENCH CAPITALISM" - A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH CHARLY COLEMAN

"THE SPIRIT OF FRENCH CAPITALISM" - A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH CHARLY COLEMAN

May 10, 2021
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Location: 

Register for the webinar - https://stanford.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_khm-aPVjS3WE1I-W3dKZ5A

Event Type: 

Please join us for a roundtable discussion with Charly Coleman, Associate Professor of History at Columbia University

How did the economy become bound up with faith in infinite wealth creation and obsessive consumption? Drawing on the economic writings of eighteenth-century French theologians, historian Charly Coleman uncovers the surprising influence of the Catholic Church on the development of capitalism. Even during the Enlightenment, a sense of the miraculous did not wither under the cold light of calculation. Scarcity, long regarded as the inescapable fate of a fallen world, gradually gave way to a new belief in heavenly as well as worldly affluence.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Department of French and Italian in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, Stanford University

Register for the webinar

 

Moderator

  • Jessica Riskin, Professor of History, Stanford University and Director for the France-Stanford Center

Panelists

  • Keith Baker, J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor in Humanities and Professor, by courtesy, of French and Italian. His research focuses on intellectual history and the history of political culture. His research on the cultural and political origins of the French Revolution has made important contributions to the development of a new understanding of that event and of its significance for the creation of modern politics.
  • Dan Edelstein, William H. Bonsall Professor in French and Professor, by courtesy, of History. He works for the most part on eighteenth-century France, with research interests in literature, history, political thought, and digital humanities. Most recently, he wrote a book on the history of natural and human rights from the wars of religion to the age of revolution (On the Spirit of Rights, University of Chicago Press).
  • Amalia Kessler, Director of the Stanford Center for Law and History and has an appointment (by courtesy) with the Stanford History Department.  She has served as the Jean-Paul Gimon Director of the France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies and has been a visiting professor at Yale Law School, Tel Aviv University Law School, the Université Panthéon-Assas (Paris II) and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales.  Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 2003, she was a trial attorney in the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and clerked for Judge Pierre N. Leval of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.
Buy the book(enter code Coleman20 to save 20%)
3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
 
Colloquium series- Apryl Williams

Colloquium series- Apryl Williams

May 10, 2021
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 

Virtual Event Contact Information Sociology@columbia.edu

Event Type: 

Colloquium series- Apryl Williams

 

Abstract: Online dating platforms seek to improve the offline dating experience by curating profiles for users based on information provided by individual profiles. However, the processes by which digital dating platforms’ algorithms decide who is shown to whom is based on several social indicators including gender, race, and attractiveness. Many of these indicators are enshrouded in bias on the programming end and explicit racism disguised as personal preference on the user end. Using data from a resume audit style experiment on a popular dating platform and 100 semi-structured interviews, I interrogate the illusion of choice provided by mobile dating applications. I hypothesize that the structure of dating platforms leads users to believe that they have access to the entire universe of users in a geographical range when, in fact, users are guided to make choices from a curated set of profiles. I find that women of doubly color suffer from this algorithmically curated process. They are particularly vulnerable to racialized interactions on digital dating platforms. They report higher frequency of fetishized interactions with other users while using mobile dating applications. I frame this fetishization as a dual consequence of sexual racism on the individual level and of exclusionary programming coded into dating platforms' algorithms. I explore the implications of lack of protections for non-normative and non-White daters on digital intimacy platforms and question the degree to which platforms are responsible for discriminatory and sometimes violent outcomes. 


Contact Information

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
 
Colloquium series- Marissa Thompson

Colloquium series- Marissa Thompson

May 11, 2021
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 

Virtual Event Contact Information Sociology@columbia.edu

Event Type: 

Colloquium series- Marissa Thompson

Marissa Thompson is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology and Education at Stanford University. Her work focuses on the causes and consequences of racial and socioeconomic inequality, with an emphasis on understanding the role of education in producing disparate outcomes over the life-course. Marissa’s current research explores the Black gender gap in educational attainment, parental choice of segregated schools, and the causal effects of school district secession. She employs both descriptive and quasi-experimental quantitative methods using secondary data (such as longitudinal studies and large administrative databases) as well as novel primary data (such as nationally-representative survey experiments). Marissa’s work has been funded by the Institute of Education Sciences and the Stanford Graduate Fellowship in Science and Engineering. Prior to her doctoral studies, she earned a B.S.E. in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

 


Contact Information

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
 
Food for Thought Policy Lecture Series: Saving Stuyvesant Town

Food for Thought Policy Lecture Series: Saving Stuyvesant Town

May 12, 2021
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Location: 

Online

Event Type: 

12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
 
Colloquium series- Felipe Dias

Colloquium series- Felipe Dias

May 12, 2021
May 12, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Location: 

Virtual Event Contact Information Sociology@columbia.edu

Event Type: 

Colloquium series- Felipe Dias

 

Felipe Dias is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Tufts University. His research agenda revolves around understanding the organizational basis for social stratification and inequality, with a particular focus on the labor market. He is currently working on several projects using field and survey experimental methods to examine processes of labor market incorporation on the basis of race, gender, and immigrant status. Felipe was previously a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University after completing his PhD in Sociology at U.C. Berkeley. 

 

Contact Information

Sociology@columbia.edu

May 12, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
 
Marie Skłodowska Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship Discussion

Marie Skłodowska Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship Discussion

May 13, 2021
12:00PM ET

Location: 

Online, registration required

Event Type: 

Register Here

Are you considering applying for a postdoc in Europe? Would you like to know more about the European Commission’s renowned Marie Skłodowska Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship? Join us online on May 13th 2021, from 12-1 pm EST, for a discussion with Dr. Tamar Blickstein, Columbia alumna and current Marie-Curie Fellow at Ca' Foscari University of Venice in Venice, Italy who will share her insights about the application process.

Dr. Blickstein will answer questions such as “how do I prepare an application with a host institution?”, “how long in advance do I need to begin preparing my application?”, “what are the characteristics of this application format?”. 

The MSCA-IF is open to applicants from all research areas incl. STEM, humanities, social sciences etc. Please bring additional questions you have. This informal gathering will also be an opportunity for you to form interdisciplinary writing groups with colleagues at Columbia who may be applying for the fellowship in the coming years.

This session will be moderated by PhD Candidate Anna Kirstine Schirrer.

Event Contact Information:
Amanda Kelly
212 305 4073
Amanda.Kelly@columbia.edu

Register Here

12:00PM ET
 
 
 
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