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February 2022

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Weather, Indigenous Knowledge, and Early European Expeditions in North America

Weather, Indigenous Knowledge, and Early European Expeditions in North America

February 09, 2022
4:00 - 6:00 PM ET

Location: 

Online, Registration required.

Event Type: 

Register Here

The first century of Spanish, French, and English expeditions into North America encountered unexpected climatic and environmental differences during an era of usual cold and drought. These challenges aggravated conflicts with Indigenous Americans and brought decades of disaster to attempted invasions and colonies, including the infamous “starving time” at Jamestown in 1609-1610. Why did it take so long for Europeans to come to grips with the climates of North America, and how did they eventually come to understand them?

This talk examines this question, with a focus on the transfer of Indigenous knowledge of weather and climate. Explicit evidence for such learning is conspicuous by its very absence. However, indirect evidence suggests that early expeditions came to recognize and adapt to North America’s stronger seasons and extreme weather only when and where they could communicate with Indigenous Americans. This talk considers what that communication about climate and weather might have involved and why it proved so difficult.

Event Speaker

Sam White, Professor of History at Ohio State University

Event Information

Free and open to the public; Registration is required. 

Part of the History and Climate Change workshop series hosted by the Environmental Sciences and Humanities Research Cluster at the Center for Science and Society and co-funded by the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy. 

The Center for Science and Society makes every reasonable effort to accommodate individuals with disabilities. If you require disability accommodations to attend a Center for Science and Society event, please contact us at scienceandsociety@columbia.edu or (212) 853-1612 at least 10 days in advance of the event. For more information, please visit the campus accessibility webpage

4:00 - 6:00 PM ET
 
 
 
 
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Complex Issues: Pride: 1950s: People Had Parties

Complex Issues: Pride: 1950s: People Had Parties

February 17, 2022
6:30 - 8:30pm ET

Location: 

Virtual.

Event Type: 

This conversation explores the first episode of Pride, a six-part documentary series chronicling the fight for LGBTQ+ rights in the United States from the 1950s to the 2000s. Each episode is dedicated to a decade and directed by a different director. Kalin’s contribution — “1950s: People Had Parties” — is a “revealing look at the vibrant and full lives lived by queer people in the 1950s amidst a steep rise in governmental regulations against the LGBTQ+ community led by Senator Joseph McCarthy, who ushered in an era of government-sanctioned persecution,” according to FX Networks.

Find more information here.

Register for the event here.

6:30 - 8:30pm ET
 
Between Black Boxes and White Cubes: "Figuring" Vogue Femme in Rashaad Newsom's "Black Magic"

Between Black Boxes and White Cubes: "Figuring" Vogue Femme in Rashaad Newsom's "Black Magic"

February 17, 2022
6:30 pm ET

Location: 

Virtual.

Event Type: 

This talk will address Brooklyn-based black visual artist Rashaad Newsome’s recent work, “Black Magic” (2019), which included live performances in both New York City and Philadelphia, an exhibition of collage, sculpture and artificial intelligence at the Philadelphia Photo Art Center, and a black contemporary art-themed drag ball. I will focus on the artist’s desire to decenter the white cube (or gallery space) in his work, even as he links performance practices with drawing and sculpture through the use of technologies like motion capture and 3D printing. Finally, I will explore the artist’s choice to center LGBT people of color themselves within discourses of both performance and visual art, figuring them as creators rather than the source material for the “real” actors of (art) history.

Find more information here.

Register for this event here.

6:30 pm ET
 
 
 
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Detlef Mertins Lecture on the Histories of Modernity delivered by Jay Cephas

Detlef Mertins Lecture on the Histories of Modernity delivered by Jay Cephas

February 21, 2022
6:30 pm ET

Location: 

Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY 10027

Event Type: 

The Detlef Mertins Lecture on the Histories of Modernity delivered by Jay Cephas, Assistant Professor of the History and Theory of Architecture at Princeton University School of Architecture.

Jay Cephas is an historian of architecture, landscapes, and cities conducting research that explores the relationships between labor, technology, and identity in the built environment. Jay analyzes both ordinary and critical spatial practices to recover the latent and as of yet invisible knowledges that are transmitted through the bodies and buildings of urban environments. In his forthcoming book, Jay deploys these frameworks to examine the agonism structuring Fordism and urbanization in early twentieth-century Detroit. Jay’s latest research project turns to New York City to address the knowledge transfer occurring between visionary architects and labor activists in their joint efforts to create cooperative housing.

More information can be found here.

Register here.

6:30 pm ET
 
 
IRAAS Conversations Lecture "The Right to Have Rights: Black Cubans on the Frontline of Protest Against the State"

IRAAS Conversations Lecture "The Right to Have Rights: Black Cubans on the Frontline of Protest Against the State"

February 23, 2022
6:30 pm ET

Location: 

Virtual.

Event Type: 

Featuring: COCO FUSCO, Interdisciplinary Artist; Writer and Professor of Art-Cooper Union and FRANK GURIDY, Associate Professor of History & African American and African Diaspora Studies-Columbia University

The resounding success of the song Grammy award winning Patria y Vida has brought the racial dimensions of recent political unrest on the island into focus. Fusco will provide an overview of the racial dimensions of Cuba's political crisis, through an exploration of the work of Afro-Cuban artists, musicians and activists and an analysis of measures adopted by the Cuban government that negatively impact its Afro-descendant population.

More information can be found here.

Register for the event here.

 

6:30 pm ET
 
Willful Subjects: Decolonizing the Psychiatric Institution

Willful Subjects: Decolonizing the Psychiatric Institution

February 23, 2022
6:30 pm ET

Location: 

Virtual, YouTube Live.

Event Type: 

This panel begins the 47th annual Scholar and Feminist Conference, “Living in Madness: Decolonization, Creation, Healing.” Panelists will discuss Institutional histories of psychiatry, focused on anti-institutional movements, radical institution-building, and alternate approaches to psychic life by practitioners and clinicians challenging the use of mental health systems as sites of state power, political oppression, and psychic violence. Our conversation will thread together case studies from the United States, China, France, and Palestine with: Liat Ben Moshe, author of Decarcerating Disability: Deinstitutionalization and Prison Abolition (2020); Emily Ng, author of A Time of Lost Gods: Mediumship, Madness, and the Ghost after Mao (2020); Camille Robcis, author of Disalienation: Politics, Philosophy, and Radical Psychiatry in Postwar France (2021); and Lara Sheehi, co – author with Stephen Sheehi of Psychoanalysis Under Occupation: Practicing Resistance in Palestine (2022), reflecting on the power of collective imagination, willful subjectivity, and witnessing as forms of resistance.

More information about this event can be found here.

RSVP for this event here.

6:30 pm ET
 
Visualizing Violence: Art Looks at the Law & History of Implicit Bias

Visualizing Violence: Art Looks at the Law & History of Implicit Bias

February 24, 2022
6:00 pm ET

Location: 

Virtual.

Event Type: 

Bayeté Ross Smith, who was selected this past fall as Columbia Law School’s inaugural Artist-in-Residence for 2021-2022, has overseen the installation of several mixed- and multi-media works in Jerome Greene Hall. To mark the installation of this exhibition, the community is invited to join a virtual event, entitled “Visualizing Violence: Art Looks at the Law and History of Implicit Bias,” which will be held on Thursday, February 24, 2022, at 6 p.m.

The discussion will examine our society’s relationship with violence, both historically and in contemporary life, through the lenses of identity, history, and visual memory. It will feature an interdisciplinary conversation including Mr. Ross Smith, Professor Jamal Joseph (Columbia School of the Arts), and others. Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law and Director of the Studio for Law and Culture, will serve as moderator.

Find more information about this event here.

Register for this event here.

6:00 pm ET
 
 
 
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Prospects for a Post-Pandemic Economic Recovery in Africa: Catch-Up, Don’t Give Up

Prospects for a Post-Pandemic Economic Recovery in Africa: Catch-Up, Don’t Give Up

February 28, 2022
1:00 - 2:30 pm ET

Location: 

Virtual, registration required

Event Type: 

Launch of the Report:

The Economic Impact of COVID-19 and Prospects for a Post-Pandemic Economic Recovery in Africa

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28 February    |    1:00-2:30PM ET (Virtual)

Register Here

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This event is hosted by ISERP's Center for Pandemic Research, Columbia Global Centers in Nairobi and Tunis, the Academy of Political Science, and the Brenthurst Foundation (Johannesburg)

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Join Lyal White and Heinrich Volmink in a panel discussion with Joseph Stiglitz (Columbia University), Sheila Jasanoff (Harvard University) and Njuguna Ndung’u (African Economic Research Consortium and former Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya) moderated by Robert Shapiro (Columbia University and Academy of Political Science).

Lyal White, Liezl Rees, Heinrich Volmink and Nikitta Hahn, The Economic Impact of COVID-19 and Prospects for a Post-Pandemic Economic Recovery in Africa (Columbia University, Academy of Political Science and the Brenthurst Foundation).


Prospects for a Post-Pandemic Economic Recovery in Africa: Catch-Up, Don’t Give Up

When the COVID-19 pandemic struck in 2019, it changed the way the world worked with far-reaching health and economic effects. The human cost has been enormous and is, with notable exceptions, well documented.

This study seeks to answer the question: How much economic damage was caused and how will African economies recover? Using information from five African countries – Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa – the researchers have produced new insights into the development and structural problems that have arisen and have looked at Africa’s future trajectory.

While the pandemic exposed a range of problems from poor data and high levels of informality in the private sector to comparatively low digital connectedness, inequality, and poor health and education systems, it has also provided a catalyst for change.

The challenges faced by the COVID-19 vaccination rollout across the continent highlight the need to improve health governance, not to mention overcoming international barriers to accessing health products and technologies, including vaccines. The need to bolster the regional bioeconomy and universalise vaccine access has never been clearer.

The time to accelerate and drive alternative areas of development has arrived. Real progress in an endemic world will only occur through a more creative and effective combination of an active private sector with entrepreneurial flair, and targeted government policy and reform.


About the Authors:

Lyal White

Prof. Lyal White is the founder of research and advisory practice Contextual Intelligence, Director of the Academy of Business Futures at Cadena Growth Partners, and Research Associate at the Brenthurst Foundation. Prior to this, he was the founding Director of the Johannesburg Business School (JBS) at the University of Johannesburg in South Africa, where he retains a Senior Research and Visiting Faculty role.
A strategic advisor on leadership, strategy and contextual intelligence in Africa and new markets, where he focuses on nuanced approaches to learning for development, his areas of interest and expertise cover a broad range of interdisciplinary fields, with a particular focus on comparative political economy and strategy in Africa, Asia and Latin America. He is widely published in news media, academic journals and books, and a regular commentator on radio, television and social media.
Having worked in a range of sectors covering themes from investment strategy, competitiveness, leadership and culture in new and complex markets to reform, growth and development in various geographies around the world, he has developed a keen interest in measuring and understanding the complexity and opportunity around context, and how this relates to a global mindset. How countries, firms and individuals improve their competitive performance balanced with purpose and impact is key. To this end, Prof. White has undertaken various studies and developed indices around metrics of performance and economic progress.
Prof. White has lived and worked in South Africa, Rwanda, Argentina, Colombia, Morocco and the US. He is an active board member of the Association of African Business Schools (AABS), to which he was elected in June 2019, and a member of the Growth-Ten Academic Advisory Board. Lyal is committed to purpose-driven business with a deep cultural understanding and impact. The right measures of performance are key. He is of the firm belief that strong institutions and connectedness build community, harnessing long-term prosperity for people and organisations across the globe.

Heinrich Volmink

Heinrich C. Volmink is a medical doctor and specialist in public health medicine. He currently consults as Public Health Specialist Advisor to Anglo American plc. He is also a board member of OUTA, an anti-corruption civil society organization in South Africa. Heinrich previously served as a Member of Parliament (MP) in National Assembly of South Africa. He is a Senior Lecturer Extraordinary in the Division of Health Systems and Public Health (Department of Global Health) of Stellenbosch University.

Heinrich holds a professional medical degree (Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine), as well as masters degrees in public administration (University of Warwick) and medicine (University of the Witwatersrand) – both earned with distinction - and is a Fellow of the College of Public Health Medicine (SA).

Nikitta Hahn

Nikitta Hahn is a researcher and writer, based in Johannesburg South Africa. Her research interests focus on economic development in the African context and alternative measures of economic progress.
Nikitta has held various research-related roles in South African academic institutions including the University of Johannesburg (UJ), The Centre for African Business (CAB) at the Johannesburg Business School (JBS) and currently, the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) at the University of Pretoria (UP).
She is completing her master’s at UJ where she graduated cum laude in her undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications. Her work in the field of economics can be found online in various digital publications.

Liezl Rees

Head of the Centre for African Business at the Johannesburg Business School, University of Johannesburg.

Liezl Rees has run the Centre for African Business (CAB) at Johannesburg Business School since 2018. In her role she is involved in the writing of teaching case studies, journal articles and white papers, and runs regular events and executive programmes which explore the context, challenges and opportunities of doing business in Africa.

Prior to joining the JBS, Liezl worked at the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) for nine years, initially running GIBS conferences for four years, followed by the Centre for Dynamic Markets (CDM).

Research highlights in Liezl’s career thus far include developing and co-authoring the ‘Dynamic Market Index 2016,’ which measures the performance and progressive change of the institutional structure and economic capabilities of countries; a journal article titled ‘Institutions and the location strategies of South African firms in Africa,’ published by Thunderbird International Business Review; and a teaching case study on ‘Dangote’s expansion: Driving African capitalism,’ which won first place in the annual Emerald – AABS Case Study Competition in 2017.

Liezl has a Masters Degree in Development Studies from the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN).

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About the Speakers:

Joseph Stiglitz

Joseph E. Stiglitz is an American economist and a professor at Columbia University. He is also the co-chair of the High-Level Expert Group on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress at the OECD, and the Chief Economist of the Roosevelt Institute. A recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (2001) and the John Bates Clark Medal (1979), he is a former senior vice president and chief economist of the World Bank and a former chairman of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers. In 2000, Stiglitz founded the Initiative for Policy Dialogue, a think tank on international development based at Columbia University. In 2011 Stiglitz was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Known for his pioneering work on asymmetric information, Stiglitz's research focuses on income distribution, climate change, corporate governance, public policy, macroeconomics and globalization. He is the author of numerous books, including People, Power, and Profits, Rewriting the Rules of the American Economy, Globalization and Its Discontents Revisited, and The Euro.

 

Njuguna Ndung’u

Njuguna Ndung'u is the Executive Director of the African Economic Research Consortium based in Kenya. He is the immediate Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya, and he has previously held positions at the University of Nairobi, the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), and the Kenya Institute of Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA). Prof. Ndung'u has extensive policy, research, and teaching experience in macroeconomics, microeconomics, econometrics, and financial development.

 

Sheila Jasanoff

Sheila Jasanoff is Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies at the Harvard Kennedy School. A pioneer in the social sciences, she explores the role of science and technology in the law, politics, and policy of modern democracies. Her books include The Fifth Branch, Science at the Bar, Designs on Nature, The Ethics of Invention, and Can Science Make Sense of Life? She founded and directs the STS Program at Harvard; previously, she was founding chair of the STS Department at Cornell. She has held distinguished visiting professorships at leading universities in Europe, Asia, Australia, and the US. Jasanoff served on the AAAS Board of Directors and as President of the Society for Social Studies of Science. Her honors include the SSRC’s Hirschman prize, the Humboldt Foundation’s Reimar-Lüst award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, foreign member of the British Academy and the Royal Danish Academy, and member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She holds AB, JD, and PhD degrees from Harvard, and honorary doctorates from the Universities of Twente and Liège.

 

Moderated by Robert Shapiro

Robert Y. Shapiro (Ph.D., Chicago, 1982) is a professor and former chair of the Department of Political Science at Columbia University, and he served as acting director of Columbia’s Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP) during 2008-2009. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received a Distinguished Columbia Faculty Award in 2012 and in 2010 the Outstanding Achievement Award of the New York Chapter of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (NYAAPOR). He specializes in American politics with research and teaching interests in public opinion, policymaking, political leadership, the mass media, and applications of statistical methods. He has taught at Columbia since 1982 after receiving his degree and serving as a study director at the National Opinion Research Center (University of Chicago).


Register Here

Wilmot James as Convenor

Harlowe Zefting as Organizer

Loren Morales Kando as Publisher (Academy of Political Science)

1:00 - 2:30 pm ET
 
 
 
 
 
 

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