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Sociology

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Doctoral Dissertation Research: Formation of Ethnoracial Identity

This project investigates the processes by which children of new groups integrate into American society. More specifically, it focuses on the individual and group-level identity-formation processes central to their incorporation. This study will expand knowledge of these fast-growing but little-studied groups, especially of how they are transitioning to new patterns of life.

The Boston Reentry Study: Analysis and Preparation of Public Use Data

In an era of historically high US incarceration rates, the transition from prison to the community of released prisoners has had far-reaching effects on the population and poverty dynamics of neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage. Despite a large body of research studying the effects of incarceration, relatively few studies have analyzed in detail the process of leaving prison and entering a community.

Collaborative Research: Science Policy Research Report: Government Brokerage of Innovation Networks

Federal agencies offer American innovators at least two different sources of support: first, seed money and consulting services that would be all but inaccessible to early stage entrepreneurs at competitive market prices; and second, introductions to potential partners in collaborative networks. Given that innovation demands collaboration as well as competition, the latter contributions are no less important than the former. But they are decidedly less well known and understood.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Intergenerational Transmission of Status in New Immigrant Families

This project is a study of U.S.-born, citizen youth to better understand the intergenerational transfer of citizenship status. The project compares the experience of youth from undocumented and documented immigrant families. The legal-illegal dichotomy ingrained in U.S. immigration policies is conceptually limiting for understanding the diversity of citizenship experiences for the children of immigrants. A more nuanced analysis is now required to further uncover the generational effects of parental undocumented status on their U.S. born children with citizenship.

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