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Sociology

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Doctoral Dissertation Research: The Autonomy of Adults with Developmental Disabilities

Recent reforms in services for people with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (ID/DD) have been oriented toward increasing the individual's opportunity for autonomy and a normal life in the community. However, adults with ID/DD show poor outcomes on almost all indicators of successful adulthood. This project examines the influence of the tension between the need for care and encouragement of autonomy on the adult lives of people with ID/DD.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Formation of Ethnoracial Identity

This project investigates the processes by which children of new groups integrate into American society. More specifically, it focuses on the individual and group-level identity-formation processes central to their incorporation. This study will expand knowledge of these fast-growing but little-studied groups, especially of how they are transitioning to new patterns of life.

The Boston Reentry Study: Analysis and Preparation of Public Use Data

In an era of historically high US incarceration rates, the transition from prison to the community of released prisoners has had far-reaching effects on the population and poverty dynamics of neighborhoods of concentrated disadvantage. Despite a large body of research studying the effects of incarceration, relatively few studies have analyzed in detail the process of leaving prison and entering a community.

Collaborative Research: Science Policy Research Report: Government Brokerage of Innovation Networks

Federal agencies offer American innovators at least two different sources of support: first, seed money and consulting services that would be all but inaccessible to early stage entrepreneurs at competitive market prices; and second, introductions to potential partners in collaborative networks. Given that innovation demands collaboration as well as competition, the latter contributions are no less important than the former. But they are decidedly less well known and understood.

Shamus Khan

Professor of Sociology & American Studies

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