The Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy is now open.  Our office hours are from: 9:00am - 5:00pm, Monday - Friday. Please refer to the COVID-19 Resource Guide for all matters related to the return to campus.  All visitors and vendors must fill out the Columbia University Health Screening Form.  We look forward to seeing you on campus.

Anthropology

Filter this result by content type

Doctoral Dissertation Research: The political economy of migration, labor, and documentation

Regularized bureaucratic strategies are demonstrated to prevent migrants with legal status from lapsing into illegal status. This can also adversely impact communities whose livelihoods depend on migrant labor. This doctoral dissertation research asks how individuals negotiate securing documentation to support their claims in changing political contexts. It focuses directly on the continuum of documents that support claims of national identity in an attempt to move beyond binary characterizations of legal status.

Mid-Career Advancement

An academic career often does not provide the uninterrupted stretches of time necessary for acquiring and building new skills to enhance and advance one’s research program. Mid-career scientists in particular are at a critical career stage where they need to advance their research programs to ensure long-term productivity and creativity but are often constrained by service, teaching, or other activities that limit the amount of time devoted to research.

Deadline: 

Monday, February 7, 2022
Monday, February 6, 2023
Monday, February 5, 2024
Monday, February 3, 2025

Global Religion Research Initiative

The initiative is dedicated to supporting the study of religion in global perspective in order to address two weaknesses in contemporary scholarship, namely the neglect of religion as a subject of study in the social sciences and relative neglect of religions outside of the North Atlantic region.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: On Terror and Trauma: Governance, Law and Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome

While contestation of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder paradigm is as old as the diagnostic category itself, the debate about what PTSD is and how to compensate victims remains unsolved to this day. Existing scholarship has examined how community organizing for compensation rights by Vietnam veterans, rape survivors, and high-risk workers has influenced the recognition of PTSD as a diagnostic category. But the intertwined juridical and scientific procedures through which PTSD evidence is indeed produced have received scant attention from the social sciences.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Labor Dynamics, Migration, and Intergenerational Community Networks

How do social and historical factors direct migration? This project, which trains a graduate student in methods of rigorous, empirical data collection and analysis, explores how migrants form and sustain communities through histories of connected movement. In tracking a South-South migration route, the researcher aims to ascertain the historical processes by which migrants are channeled into specific forms of labor in different places.

Understanding and Supporting Anchor Businesses to Build a Culture of Health

This call for proposals will focus on supporting empirical research to understand the ways that for-profit anchors advance health and well-being in the communities where they are located. Funded studies are expected to include rigorous empirical research that will inform the business case for why and how more companies serve as anchor institutions in their immediate surrounding geographies.

Deadline: 

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Korean Studies Grants

The Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies (NEAC), in conjunction with the Korea Foundation, offers a grant program in Korean studies designed to assist the research of individual scholars based in North America to improve the quality of teaching about Korea on both the college and precollege levels, and to integrate the study of Korea into the major academic disciplines.

Deadline: 

Friday, October 1, 2021
Wednesday, February 2, 2022

Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

The Russell Sage Foundation’s program on Race, Ethnicity & Immigration supports innovative investigator-initiated research on the social, economic, and political effects of the changing racial and ethnic composition of the U.S. population, including the transformation of communities and ideas about what it means to be American. We are especially interested in research that examines the roles of race, ethnicity, nativity, gender and legal status in outcomes for immigrants, U.S.-born racial and ethnic minorities, and native-born whites.

Deadline: 

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Scholarly Communication

To empower researchers by supporting the development and adoption of new resources for managing the increasingly diverse array of digital communication channels, enabling scientists to more effectively locate relevant research, network with other researchers, and disseminate their work to the scientific community and the public.

Pages

Subscribe to Anthropology

Newsletter

Don't want to miss our interesting news and updates! Make sure to join our newsletter list.

* indicates required

Contact us

For general questions about ISERP programs, services, and events.