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Immigration

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Dissertation Research Grants

The Russell Sage Foundation (RSF) has established a dissertation research grants (DRG) program to support innovative and high-quality dissertation research projects that address questions relevant to RSF’s priority areas: Behavioral Science and Decision Making in Context; Future of Work; Race, Ethnicity and Immigration; Immigration and Immigrant Integration; and Social, Political, and Economic Inequality.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, March 1, 2022

Pipeline Grants Competition

The Russell Sage Foundation, in partnership with the Economic Mobility and Opportunity program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, seeks to advance innovative research on economic mobility and access to opportunity in the United States. We are interested in research focused on structural barriers to economic mobility and how individuals, communities, and governments have come to understand, navigate, and challenge the existence of systemic inequalities.

Deadline: 

Thursday, November 4, 2021

Small Grants in Computational Social Science (CSS)

RSF’s initiative on Computational Social Science supports innovative social science research that utilizes new data and methods to advance our understanding of the research issues that comprise its core social science programs in Social Inequality, Behavioral Economics, Future of Work, and Race, Ethnicity and Immigration. Limited consideration will be given to research that focuses primarily on methodologies, such as causal inference and innovations in data collection.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Research into Immigration and Crime

With this solicitation, NIJ seeks proposals for research projects that increase understanding of the relationship between immigration, both legal and illegal, and crime. Applicants should propose research projects that have clear implications for criminal justice policy and practice in the United States. NIJ encourages applicants to submit proposals for innovative approaches to advance the field’s rigor and methodology in understanding the relationship between immigration and crime.

Deadline: 

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

RSF will accept letters of inquiry (LOIs) under all of its core programs and special initiatives: Behavioral Science and Decision Making in Context; Future of Work; Immigration and Immigrant Integration; Race, Ethnicity and Immigration; Social, Political, and Economic Inequality. In addition, RSF will also accept LOIs relevant to any of its core programs that address at least one of the following issues: research on the Covid-19 pandemic and the resulting recession in the U.S. OR research focused on systemic racial inequality and/or the recent mass protests in the U.S.

Deadline: 

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Gendered Differences in the Causes and Consequences of Migration: Experimental Evidence from India and the United Arab Emirates

This pilot project designs and evaluates the impact of skills training and certification on recruitment of low-skilled labor migrants from a virtually untapped international migration corridor- North-Eastern India to the United Arab Emirate- focusing particularly on women. The researchers seek to understand whether the act of migrating and the capital that follows has the potential of altering migrants and their communities' welfare in terms of their economic behavior, policy preference, socio-political engagement, intra-household bargaining, and tolerance levels.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Intergenerational Transmission of Status in New Immigrant Families

This project is a study of U.S.-born, citizen youth to better understand the intergenerational transfer of citizenship status. The project compares the experience of youth from undocumented and documented immigrant families. The legal-illegal dichotomy ingrained in U.S. immigration policies is conceptually limiting for understanding the diversity of citizenship experiences for the children of immigrants. A more nuanced analysis is now required to further uncover the generational effects of parental undocumented status on their U.S. born children with citizenship.

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