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National Science Foundation

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Smart and Connected Communities

Cities and communities in the U.S. and around the world are entering a new era of transformational change, in which their inhabitants and the surrounding built and natural environments are increasingly connected by smart technologies, leading to new opportunities for innovation, improved services, and enhanced quality of life.

Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases

The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases program supports research on the ecological, evolutionary, and socio-ecological principles and processes that influence the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases. The central theme of submitted projects must be quantitative or computational understanding of pathogen transmission dynamics. The intent is discovery of principles of infectious disease transmission and testing mathematical or computational models that elucidate infectious disease systems.

Deadline: 

Wednesday, November 16, 2022
Wednesday, November 15, 2023
Wednesday, November 20, 2024

Dynamics of Integrated Socio-Environmental Systems

The CNH2 Program supports research projects that advance basic scientific understanding of integrated socio-environmental systems and the complex interactions (dynamics, processes, and feedbacks) within and among the environmental (biological, physical and chemical) and human ("socio") (economic, social, political, or behavioral) components of such a system. The program seeks proposals that emphasize the truly integrated nature of a socio-environmental system versus two discrete systems (a natural one and a human one) that are coupled.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, November 15, 2022
Wednesday, November 15, 2023
Friday, November 15, 2024

Data Infrastructure Building Blocks

The NSF vision for a Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21) considers an integrated, scalable, and sustainable cyberinfrastructure to be crucial for innovation in science and engineering (see www.nsf.gov/cif21). The Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs) program is an integral part of CIF21. The DIBBs program encourages development of robust and shared data-centric cyberinfrastructure capabilities, to accelerate interdisciplinary and collaborative research in areas of inquiry stimulated by data.

Deadline: 

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Developmental Sciences

DS supports basic research that increases our understanding of cognitive, linguistic, social, cultural, and biological processes related to human development across the lifespan. Research supported by this program will add to our knowledge of the underlying developmental processes that support social, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, thereby illuminating ways for individuals to live productive lives as members of society.

Deadline: 

Friday, July 15, 2022
Tuesday, January 17, 2023
Monday, July 17, 2023

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Race, Achievement and Trust in Student-Teacher Relationships

Racial inequality in education has a long history in the United States. The most persistent manifestation of this history is the racial achievement gap. This project will address the racial achievement gap from the vantage point of black students in racially segregated, high-poverty schools. More specifically, this study examines how trust shapes the quality of their relationships with teachers and their educational outcomes. This research is guided by the premise that trust can be a lever for improving the schooling experiences and academic performance of disadvantaged students.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: Making Democracy Work for Women: Gender Gaps in Political Participation and Representation

Despite legal guarantees of equality, stark gaps in political participation and representation persist between men and women in democracies around the world. Evidence from advanced industrialized democracies shows that when women participate in higher numbers as voters (e.g. after the extension of suffrage rights), it produces policy shifts in line with their political preferences. However, it is unclear whether similar outcomes result in developing contexts where women?s voting rights are guaranteed in the constitution as a result of elite, rather than popular consensus.

Collaborative Research: Market Based Emissions Policies

This project funds research that will evaluate how firms and consumers respond to market-based policies that are supposed to improve air quality and address environmental issues. The focus here is on testing hypotheses drawn from economic theory about how new environmental policies affect business and public health in the rapidly growing Chinese economy. China is about to adopt a new national program of cap-and-trade emissions policies. The research team will collect innovative measures of pollution, firm outcomes, and individual health.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: The Political Determinants of Economic Exchange

Confidence in basic economic exchange is an important building block for economies. This confidence in economic exchange is often affected by state institutions that possess the authority to enforce contracts which ensure agreements are not broken. In much of the world, however, weak state institutions limit the confidence of citizens and businesses that contracts and deals will be enforced fairly. As a result, economic exchange is stifled and inefficiencies persist.

Doctoral Dissertation Research: American Mayors: How Voters Choose and How Mayors Shape Policy

Questions about whether and how political leaders influence outcomes are fundamental to the study of politics. If politicians are responsive to constituent opinions, one would expect to observe similar outcomes across different leaders. In reality, though, public policy outcomes tend to vary systematically depending on who serves in elected office. This dissertation examines representation in American cities. New data reveal that American mayors, like politicians at higher levels of government, tend not to be highly representative of their constituents.

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